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ISA • Songwriter Obituaries


Songwriter Obituaries 2017


Peter Skellern
(69), singer-songwriter ('You're A Lady', 'Hold On To Love' and 'Love Is The Sweetest Thing'), and Church of England priest. In Lanteglos-by-Fowey, Cornwall, UK, of a brain tumour


Leon Ware
(77), songwriter who penned hits for artists like Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones including such songs as 'After The Dance', 'I Wanna Be Where You Are', 'Inside My Love,' 'If I Ever Lose This Heaven' and 'Sumthin, Sumthin'. He also worked with The Isley Brothers, Ike & Tina Turner, the Four Tops,  Teena Marie, Jeffrey Osborne, Loose Ends, James Ingram, Melissa Manchester, Krystol, Bobby Womack, Lulu, and Bobby Womack. In Detroit, Michigan, USA, of prostrate cancer


Al Jarrreau
(76), singer and songwriter ('We're In This Love Together', 'Your Precious Love' and 'Moonlighting'). In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure


Ilene Berns
(73), songwriter and ('You Forgot How To Love') and music publisher (Bang Records and Web IV Publishing) whose catalogues included hits written by Paul Davies ('I Go Crazy', 'Sweet Life', 'Ride 'Em Cowboy' and 'Do Right'), and her husband Bert Berns ( 'Twist and Shout', 'Piece of My Heart', 'Tell Him', 'Here Comes The Night', 'Cry to Me', 'Everybody Needs Somebody To Love', 'A Little Bit Of Soap', 'I Want Candy', 'Cry Baby' and 'Hang On Sloopy'). In Miami, Florida, USA, of cancer


Maggie Roche
(65), folk-rock singer-songwriter who worked and recorded with her Irish-American sisters Terre and Suzzy as The Roches, and who sang background vocals on Paul Simon's album 'There Goes Rhymin' Simon'. In New York City, USA, of cancer


Joey Powers
(82), singer-songwriter ('Midnight Mary') whose early recordings were backed instrumentally by Paul Simon and Roger McGuinn, and who went on to record albums with Roy Orbison and Bobby Bare. He also owned a recording studio working with Jethro Tull, Tony Orlando, Steve Allen, The Kinks and Aerosmith and won a Gospel Music Association Dove Award for Album Of The Year in 1991 for 'Triumphant Return' by Whitecross. In 1994, he was ordained a minister, and later moved to Saint Petersburg, Russia to set up an orphanage and a recording studio. In Washington, Pennsylvania, USA, of heart failure


Larry Steinbachek
(56), keyboardist and songwriter with Bronski Beat ('Smalltown Guy', 'Why?' and 'Hit That Perfect Beat'). In London, UK, of cancer


Bobby Freeman
(76), singer-songwriter whose classic song 'Do You Wanna Dance' was also recorded by Del Shannon, the Beach Boys, Johnny Rivers, Bette Midler, John Lennon, Cliff Richard, Marc Bolan & T.Rex, the Mamas & The Papas, Bobby Vee and the Ramones. His other hits include 'Betty Lou Got A New Pair Of Shoes', 'Need Your Love', 'Shimmy Shimmy' and 'C'mon And Swim'. In San Francisco, California, USA, of heart failure


John Wetton
(67), singer-songwriter with such bands as Mogul Thrash, Family, King Crimson, Roxy Music, Uriah Heep, and Wishbone Ash, before founding Asia ('Only Time Will Tell' and 'Heat Of The Moment'). In Bournemouth, Dorset, UK, from colon cancer


Walter Morrison
(62), musician and songwriter ('Funky Worm' and 'One Nation Under A Groove'), who worked with such acts as The Ohio Players and Parliament-Funkadelic. In Dayton, Ohio, of heart failure


Tommy Allsup
(85), guitarist and songwriter ('Guitar Twist') who backed Buddy Holly on the Winter Dance Party tour and flipped a coin with Ritchie Valens for a seat on the aircraft that took the lives of Holly, Valens and the Big Bopper. Allsup who also worked with such stars as Roy Orbison, Willie Nelson, Eddie Cochran, Walter Brennan, Bobby Vee, Johnny Burnette, Julie London, Vickie Carr, George Jones, Mickey Gilley, Hank Thompson, Lorrie Morgan and Asleep At The Wheel, played guitar on more than 10,000 recordings including Buddy Holly's 'It's So Easy', The Everly Brothers 'Lucille', Jan & Dean's 'Dead Man's Curve', Kenny Rogers' 'The Gambler', and Asleep At The Wheel's 'The Letter That Johnny Walker Read'. In Springfield, Missouri, USA, following complications from hernia surgery


William Onyeabor
(70), musician and songwriter, whose nine electronic-funk albums included such songs as 'Body and Soul,',  'Atomic Bomb' and 'Why Go To War.'. In  Enugu, Nigeria, from cancer


Buddy Bregman
(86), arranger and composer ('The Pajama Game', 'Five Guns West', 'The Wild Party', 'The Delicate Delinquent', and 'Born Reckless'), and who worked with such stars as Alan King, Andre Previn, Andy Williams, Barbra Streisand, Betty Hutton, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Bobby Darin, Buddy Holly, Count Basie, Dean Martin, Debbie Reynolds, Dionne Warwick, Duke Ellington, Eddie Fisher, Frank Sinatra, Fred Astaire, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jane Fonda, Jimmy Durante, Judy Garland, K.C. & The Sunshine Band, Louis Armstrong, Mary Tyler Moore, Michael Crawford, Oscar Peterson, Paul Anka, Peggy Lee, Peter Lawford, Quincy Jones, Rick Nelson, Ritchie Valens, Sam Cooke, Stan Getz, Theolonius Monk, Tony Bennett, Vic Damone, Victor Borge and Yves St. Laurent.  In Los Angeles, California, USA, of Alzheimer's disease


Billy Joe Burnette
(76), singer-songwriter ('Teddy Bear' 'Teddy Bear's Last Ride', 'Marlene,' 'Stomp, Shout & Twist,' 'Billy The Kid' and 'Blue Misery') and who recorded for Parkway, Warner Bros., Magic Lamp, Deville, Gold Standard and Badger. In Port Orange, Florida, USA, of cancer


Ruth B. White
(87), music publisher and writer, who spent her entire life working in Nashville with such songwriters as Carmol Taylor, Norro Wilson, Sonny James, Gary Gentry and Joe Stampley, and for such companies as Hickory Records, October Records, Sounds of Nashville, Reed Music, Sound Factory Records and Porter Wagoner Enterprises. Her books include Every Highway Out of Nashville, The Original Goober (with Goober Buchanan), You Can Make It If You Try (with Ted Jarrett), Nashville Steeler (with Don Davis), Every Highway Out of Nashville Volume Two and Knoxville's Merry-Go-Round. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure


Greg Trooper
(61), singer-songwriter whose songs have been recorded by such stars as Vince Gill ('When I Call Your Name'), Steve Earle ('Little Sister'), Robert Earl Keen, and Billy Bragg. In Austin, Texas, of pancreatic cancer


Peter Sarstedt
(75), singer-songwriter ('Where Do You Go To My Lovely' winner of an Ivor Novello Award), 'Frozen Orange Juice', 'Beirut', 'Take Off Your Clothes' and 'I'm A Cathedral'). Brother of singers Eden Kane and Robin Sarstedt. In Sussex, UK, of progressive supranuclear palsy

Songwriter Obituaries 2016


George Michael
(53), singer-songwriter and former member of Wham! (the duo whose hits included 'Last Christmas' and 'Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go'). George Michael's subsequent solo successes included 'Careless Whisper', 'Freedom! '90', 'A Different Corner', 'Faith', 'One More Try', 'Praying For Time', 'Heal The Pain', 'Don't Let The Sun Go Down On Me' (with Elton John), 'Somebody To Love' (with Queen), 'Jesus To A Child', 'Fastlove', 'Waltz Away Dreaming', 'Outside', 'Amazing' and 'December Song (I Dreamed Of Christmas)'. Winner of three Brit Awards (winning Best British Male twice), four MTV Video Music Awards, four Ivor Novello Awards, three American Music Awards, and two Grammy Awards.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Goring-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, UK, from heart failure


Rick Parfitt
(68), singer-songwriter and founding member of Status Quo, whose hits included 'Whatever You Want', 'Again And Again', 'Rain', 'Rocking All Over The World', 'Pictures Of Matchstick Men', 'In The Army Now', 'Caroline' and 'Down Down'. In  Marbella, Spain, following an infection


Frank Murray
(66), manager who worked with such acts as Thin Lizzy, Elton John, The Specials and The Pogues,  and reputedly the person who persuaded Shane McGowan to write 'Fairytale Of New York'. In Dublin, Ireland, of heart failure


Andrew Dorff
(40), songwriter whose  Number 1 hits included 'My Eyes' and 'Neon Light' for Blake Shelton, Kenny Chesney's 'Save It For A Rainy Day' and Hunter Hayes' 'Somebody's Heartbreak'. The brother of Hollywood actor Stephen Dorff and son of songwriter Steve Dorff, Andrew is believed to have died in Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA. The cause of death is not known


Holly Dunn
(59), singer-songwriter, painter and radio-TV host, whose hits included  'Daddy's Hands', 'Are You Ever Gonna Love Me' and 'You Really Had Me Going'. In Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, of ovarian cancer


Mark Gray
(64), singer-songwriter and former member of Exile, whose Number 1 songs included  Alabama's 'Take Me Down' and 'The Closer You Get' and Janie Fricke's 'It Ain't Easy Being Easy', as well as his own Top 10 hits, 'Left Side Of The Bed' and 'Diamonds In The Dust'. In Lebanon, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure


Greg Lake
(69), singer-songwriter and founding member of both King Crimson and Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP), whose hit compositions included  'Lucky Man', 'From The Beginning' and 'I Believe In Father Christmas'. In London, UK, from cancer 


Alan Thicke
(69), actor, TV host and songwriter, who came to fame as the father in the hit television series 'Growing Pains'. He also composed theme songs for several top shows including 'Wheel Of Fortune', 'The Facts Of Life' and 'Diff'rent Strokes'. In Los Angeles, California, USA, following a heart attack


Claude 'Curly' Putman Jr
(85), singer and songwriter, whose hits include 'Green Green Grass Of Home' for Porter Wagoner (covered by Tom Jones, Roger Miller, Elvis Presley, Kenny Rogers, Don Williams, Burl Ives, Johnny Darrell, Gram Parsons, Joan Baez, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Grateful Dead, Johnny Cash, Roberto Leal, Dean Martin, Merle Haggard, Bobby Bare, Joe Tex, and Nana Mouskouri), along with such classics as the George Jones hit 'He Stopped Loving Her Today' (often cited as the greatest country song of all time), Tammy Wynette's 'D-I-V-O-R-C-E', 'My Elusive Dreams' for David Houston & Tammy Wynette, 'Blood Red And Goin' Down' (Tanya Tucker), 'Do You Wanna Go To Heaven' ( T.G. Sheppard), and 'It's A Cheatin' Situation' (Moe Bandy).

In addition, Mr. Putman scored several hits as a recording artist for ABC Records during the 1960's, including 'The Prison Song', 'My Elusive Dreams' and Set Me Free'. Even the Putman family farm was immortalised in song when Paul McCartney penned 'Junior's Farm' while living with the Putmans during a six-week recording session in Nashville in 1974.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer


Leonard Cohen
(82), legendary singer-songwriter whose classic compositions include 'The Sisters Of Mercy', 'Bird On A Wire'. 'Suzanne', 'Chelsea Hotel', 'Hallelujah', 'Hey That's No Way To Say Goodbye', 'Tower Of Song', 'Everybody Knows', 'Leaving The Table' and 'First We Take Manhattan'.

Mr. Cohen's songs have been covered by such acts as Johnny Cash, Nina Simone, John Cale, Jeff Buckley, Alexandra Burke, Bruce Springsteen, Noel Harrison, Willie Nelson, k.d. lang, U2, Tom Jones,  Lloyd Cole, Tori Amos, Don Henley, Rufus Wainwright and Bette Midler.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Los Angeles, California, USA, following a fall


Bap Kennedy
(54), singer-songwriter ('Flowers for Julie' and 'Shine On Christmas Star') and former member of Energy Orchard. In Belfast, Ireland, of cancer


Al Caiola
(96), guitarist and composer ( 'The Magnificent Seven' and 'Bonanza'), who also worked as a session musician with such acts as Buddy Holly, Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Johnny Mathis, Simon and Garfunkel, Sarah Vaughan, Glen Campbell and Rosemary Clooney. In Allendale, New Jersey, USA, of heart failure


Leon Russell
(74), singer and songwriter whose songs include 'Tight Rope' and 'Lady Blue' recorded by himself, as well as such hits as 'Everybody Loves A Clown' and 'She's Just My Style' (both for Gary Lewis & The Playboys), 'Delta Lady' (Joe Cocker), and 'A Song For You' (recorded by The Carpenters, Ray Charles, Peggy Lee, Willie Nelson, Helen Reddy, Whitney Houston, Elkie Brooks, Amy Winehouse, Donny Hathaway, and Christina Aguilera).

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. Songwriters Hall of Fame Inductee. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure


Mentor Williams
(70), singer-songwriter, brother of songwriter Paul Williams, and composer of Dobie Gray's hit, 'Drift Away', 'A Few Ole Country Boys' (Randy Travis and George Jones), Alabama's classic 'When We Make Love' along with songs recorded by The Ventures, Rod Stewart, Michael Bolton, Ray Charles and Roy Orbison. At his home in Taos, New Mexico, USA, of heart failure


Bobby Vee
(73), singer-songwriter whose hits include 'Devil Or Angel', 'Rubber Ball', 'Run To Him', 'Take Good Care Of My Baby' 'The Night Has A Thousand Eyes' and 'Come Back When You Grow Up', and who was regarded as perhaps the foremost American teen idol of the 1960's, scoring 38 entries on the Billboard charts.

An ardent Buddy Holly fan, Bobby started his career at the age of 15 as a replacement for Holly on the night following that singer's death in an air-crash not far from Vee's home town, and he later teamed up for an album with Holly's former group, The Crickets.

In his early days, his pianist was Robert Zimmerman, later to become Bob Dylan, and it was Dylan who suggested that Bobby Velline change his surname to Vee. Dylan later wrote that Vee "had a metallic, edgy tone to his voice and it was as musical as a silver bell." When Dylan appeared in St. Paul Minnesota, in 2013, he pointed out Bobby Vee in the audience before performing Vee's first hit "Suzie Baby."

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Rogers, Minnesota, USA, from Alzheimer's Disease


Rod Temperton
(66), songwriter-producer and former member of Heatwave ('Boogie Nights' and 'Always And Forever'), and whose hits for others included 'Thriller', 'Off The Wall' and 'Rock With You' for Michael Jackson, 'Give Me The Night' for George Benson, 'Baby, Come To Me' for Patti Austin and James Ingram and  'Stomp!' for The Brothers Johnson.

Rod also received an Oscar nomination for 'Miss Celie's Blues (Sister)' from the movie The Colour Purple, and penned multiple hits for such acts as Donna Summer, Herbie Hancock, The Manhattan Transfer and Mica Paris.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In London, UK, from cancer 


Jean Shepard
(82), country singer-songwriter whose 73 hits included 'A Dear John Letter', 'I Want To Go Where No One Knows Me', 'Second Fiddle (To An Old Guitar)', 'If The Teardrops Were Silver', 'Slippin' Away', ' and 'I'll Do Anything It Takes (To Stay With You)'.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. A sixty-year veteran of the Grand Ole Opry and a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame. In Hendersonville, Tennessee, USA, of Parkinson's Disease


Robert Bateman
(80), Motown songwriter ('Please Mr. Postman', 'Playboy' and 'Twistin' Postman'), and founder of The Satintones, Motown's first group to release a single. Robert later discovered The Marvelettes, and well as producing The Falcons, Wilson Pickett and Supremes' member Florence Ballard. In Sherman Oaks, California, USA, following a heart attack


Don Ciccone
(71), song and jingle writer, and recording member of The Critters ('Younger Girl', 'Mr Dieingly Sad', 'Bad Misunderstanding' and 'Don't Let The Rain Fall Down On Me') and The Four Seasons ('Who Loves You' and 'December,1963'), and performing member of Tommy James & The Shondells. In Platsfield, New Jersey, USA, of heart failure


Richard Trentlage
(87), jingle writer (Oscar Mayer Wieners, McDonald's, The National Safety Council and V8). In Libertyville, Illinois, USA, following a heart attack


Oscar Brand
(96), folk singer-songwriter who published more than 300 songs and recorded over 100 albums, as well as being host of radio's Oscar Brand's Folksong Festival, which was broadcast continuously since 1945 on WNYC-AM 820 in New York City, making it the longest-running radio show featuring the same presenter. In Great Neck, New York, USA, of heart failure


Kashif
56), singer-songwriter, record producer former member of B T Express and multiple Grammy nominee whose hits include tracks by Whitney Houston, Evelyn 'Champagne' King, George Benson and Jermaine Jackson. Kashif also wrote the book Everything You'd Better Know About The Record Business and founded Kashif University, a college young people interested in music and the arts. In Los Angeles,California, USA, of heart failure


Rob Meurer
(65), singer-songwriter and former member of the rock band Christopher Cross ('Ride Like The Wind', 'Arthur's Theme' and 'Sailing'). In Studio City, California, USA, following a hit-and-run accident


Prince Buster
(78), Jamaican singer-songwriter and record producer and one of the most important figures in ska and rocksteady music, whose hits include 'Ten Commandments', 'One Step Beyond' and 'Al Capone'. In Miami, Florida, USA,  following a heart attack


Juan Gabriel
(66), Mexican singer-songwriter whose 1500 published songs include such hits as 'Amor Eterno', 'Querida', 'Yo No Nací Para Amar', 'Hasta Que Te Conocí', 'El Noa Noa', 'No Tengo Dinero', 'Abrázame Muy Fuerte', 'Te lo Pido por Favor', 'En Esta Primavera', 'Pero Qué Necesidad', 'Te Sigo Amando', 'Siempre en Mi Mente, 'De Mí Enamórate', and 'Lo Pasado, Pasado'. While on an American tour, in Santa Monica, California, USA, following a heart attack


John D Loudermilk
(82), singer-songwriter, whose solo hits include 'Language Of Love' 'Thou Shalt Not Steal', 'Callin' Doctor Casey' and Road Hog, and whose songs for other artists include 'Sittin' In The Balcony' (Eddie Cochran), Abilene' (George Hamilton IV), 'Angela Jones' (Johnny Ferguson and Michael Cox), 'A Rose and a Baby Ruth' (George Hamilton IV), 'Bad News' (Johnny Cash), 'Big Daddy s Alabamy Bound' (Boots Randolph, Chet Atkins, the Willis Brothers), 'Blue Train' (George Hamilton IV), 'Break My Mind' (George Hamilton IV, Anne Murray, Sammy Davis, Jr, Glen Campbell, Linda Ronstadt, Roy Orbison, Gram Parsons, Wreckless Eric, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Vern Gosdin and The Box Tops), 'Ebony Eyes' (The Everly Brothers), 'Everything's Alright' (The Newbeats), 'Google Eye' (The Nashville Teens), 'The Great Snowman' (Bob Luman), 'Indian Reservation' (Don Fardon and Paul Revere and The Raiders), 'Norman' (Sue Thompson) 'Paper Tiger' (Sue Thompson), 'Sad Movies' (Sue Thompson), 'Sun Glasses', (Skeeter Davis, Sandy Posey and Tracey Ullman), 'Talk Back Trembling Lips' (Johnny Tillotson), 'Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye' (The Casinos and Johnny Nash), 'This Little Bird' (Marianne Faithfull and The Nashville Teens), 'Thou Shalt Not Steal' (Dick and Dee Dee), 'Tobacco Road' (The Nashville Teens, Lou Rawls, the Blues Magoos, Jefferson Airplane, Rare Earth, Edgar Winter's White Trash and David Lee Roth), 'Top 40, News, Weather and Sports' (Mark Dinning), 'Torture' (Kris Jensen), 'Turn Me On' (Norah Jones) and 'Waterloo' (Stonewall Jackson).

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Christiana, Tennessee, USA, of bone cancer


Kacey Jones
(66), singer-songwriter and comedian, whose hits include 'I'm the One Mama Warned You About' (Mickey Gilley) and 'Cold Turkey' (David Allan Coe), as well hits for Cledus T. Judd, Richard Fagan, Ray Stevens and Marshall Chapman, along with such solo recordings as 'One Nite Stan', 'It's Just The Whiskey Talkin', 'Last Night I Really Laid Down The Law', 'Smokin' In Bed', 'Up Against Your Love',  'Christmas In Rehab,' 'Whatever Happened To Kenny Rogers' Face,' 'Show Up Naked - Bring Beer,' 'I Wanna Be Up Front Like Dolly,' 'Dressin' Up For The Pizza Man,' 'I Can Always Get Skinny But You'll Never Be Tall,' 'Put The Seat Back Down' and 'I Miss My Man (But My Aim's Gettin' Better)'. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer


Pat Upton
(75), lead vocalist and guitarist with the Spiral Staircase (as well as being a former guitarist for Rick Nelson), and writer of such hits as  'More Today Than Yesterday' (a song intended for Bobby Goldsboro), 'Baby What I Mean', 'No One For Me To Turn To' and 'She's Ready'. In Guntersville, Alabama, USA, of cancer


Richard Fagan
(69), songwriter whose hits include 'Sold (The Grundy County Auction Incident)' and 'Be My Baby Tonight' for John Michael Montgomery, 'The Good Lord Loves You' (Neil Diamond), as well as hits for  Com Hunley, Mel McDaniel, B B Watson, Clay Walker, Ricochet, Hank Williams, Jr., Charlie Floyd, George Jones, Shania Twain, Patty Loveless, Collin Raye, Shenandoah, The Crickets, Jason & the Scorchers and The Blues Brothers Band.

In addition, he penned a Presidential campaign song, several network television themes, a national sports anthem and a large number of movie songs. In 2008, he was accused of the murder of his best friend and manager Tom Oteri, but was later released when it transpired that Oteri had in fact died of a heart attack. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer     


Mike Hart
(73), singer songwriter and former leader of Liverpool band The Roadrunners, whose songs include 'Aberfan' and 'Shelter Song'. In Edinburgh, Scotland, of cancer


William Hawkins
(75), singer songwriter whose hits include 'Gnostic Serenade' (3's A Crowd), and whose songs were recorded by The Esquires, The Children and Tom Rush. In Ontario, Canada, of cancer
 

Fred Tomlinson
(88), singer songwriter who penned Monty Python's 'The Lumberjack Song' and who for many years led the Fred Tomlinson Singers, providing vocals for 'Monty Python's Flying Circus', 'The Two Ronnies', 'Dad's Army', 'Only Fools And Horses' and many other television shows. In Rawtenstall, Lancashire, UK, of heart failure


Ralph Stanley
(89), bluegrass singer songwriter and one half of The Stanley Brothers, whose hits include 'Man Of Constant Sorrow' (used in the movie 'O Brother, Where Art Thou') and 'Finger Poppin' Time'. Grammy Award winner, honorary Doctor of Music at Lincoln Memorial University,  International Bluegrass Music Hall inductee and Member of the Grand Ole Opry.  In Coeburn, Virginia, USA, of skin cancer


Gary S. Paxton
(77), singer, songwriter and co-producer of 'Alley Oop' (the Hollywood Argyles) as well as being the 'Flip' half of the duo Skip and Flip ('It Was I' and 'Cherry Pie'), but who also produced such hits as 'The Monster Mash' (Bobby 'Boris' Pickett), 'Along Comes Mary' and 'Cherish' (The Association), 'Sweet Pea' and 'Hooray For Hazel' (Tommy Roe).

In the 1970's, he moved to Bakersfield, California, starting another career as a country music producer and songwriter, before being shot and seriously wounded by a hit man hired by a recording act he was producing. In 1975, he produced and performed as a gospel singer, winning the Best Inspirational Grammy for his 1975 album 'The Astonishing, Outrageous, Amazing, Incredible, Unbelievable, Different World Of Gary S. Paxton'. A Country Gospel Music Hall Of Fame Member. In Branson, Missouri, USA, from Hepatitis C   


Bonny 'Sir Mack' Rice
(82), former member of The Falcons ('You're So Fine'), who turned to songwriting in the 1960's, penning such songs as 'Mustang Sally' (a hit for fellow Falcons member Wilson Pickett), 'Respect Yourself' (The Staple Singers and later Bruce Willis), as well as Johnnie Taylor's 1973 hit 'Cheaper To Keep Her'. In Detroit, Michigan, USA of complications from Alzheimer's Disease


Elliot Marvin Wolff
(60), songwriter and producer whose hits include Paula Abdul's 'Straight Up' Johnny Gill's 'Super Love', Paula Abdul's 'Cold Hearted', Taylor Dayne'a 'Heart Of Stone' and Color Me Badd's 'The Earth, The Sun, The Rain'. He also worked with Atlantic Starr, Aretha Franklin, the Corrs, Chynna Phillips and Debbie Gibson. In the Pecos River, New Nexico, USA, from drowning while on a camping trip


Rokusuke Ei
(83), songwriter and radio program host, who wrote the lyrics for Kyu Sakamoto's 'Ue O Muite Aruko', which became a Number 1 hit in the US in 1963 as 'Sukiyaki', becoming the only Japanese language song to reach Number 1 in America. The original Japanese title 'I Look Up As I Walk' was renamed after a popular Japanese dish when an executive at Capitol Records in New York discovered that the song was actually a protest against continued American Air Force involvement in Japan. In Tokyo, Japan, from heart failure 


Gérard Bourgeois
(80) composer and songwriter who penned Brigitte Bardot's 'La Madrague' and Juliette Greco's 'Un Petit Poisson, Un Petit Oiseau'. In Bordeaux, France, from heart failure


Corry Brokken
(83), winner of the 1957 Eurovision Song Contest for the Netherlands with the 'Net Als Toen', written by Guus Jansen and Willy van Hemer. Brokken appeared again in the 1958 contest, and went on to have a successful entertainment career in Holland which included presenting the 1976 Eurovision, before quitting to study law, eventually being appointed a judge. She returned to show business upon her retirement from the legal profession recording several albums and also working as a magazine columnist. In Laren, Holland, from heart failure 


Chips Moman
(79), producer and songwriter whose compositions included 'Dark End Of The Street' (James Carr), 'Do Right Woman, Do Right Man' (Aretha Franklin), '(Hey Won't You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song' (B J Thomas), and 'Luckenbach, Texas' (Waylon Jennings). In addition, he produced such acts as Elvis Presley, The Mar-Keys, Carla Thomas, William Bell, The Gentry's, BJ Thomas, Neil Diamond, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison. In LaGrange, Georgia, USA, following a lengthy struggle with lung disease


Floyd Robinson
(83), country singer-songwriter whose hits included 'Makin' Love', and 'The Little Space Girl' and who worked with such stars as Chet Atkins, George Jones, Jim Reeves, Eddy Arnold and Jimmy Dickens. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure


Rick Christian
(61), singer-songwriter best known for penning the Kenny Rogers' hit 'I Don't Need You', but who also released a number of solo country albums. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer


Bill Ham
(79), songwriter, manager, producer and publisher, best known as the longtime manager, producer and publisher of ZZ Top, but who also worked with Clint Black and whose company Hamstein Music signed such writers as Clint Black, Hayden Nicholas, Frankie Miller, members of Little Texas, Tom Shapiro, Chris Waters, Rick Giles, Chuck Jones, Tommy Barnes, Stephen Allan Davis, Billy Kirsch, Tony Martin, Reese Wilson, Lee Thomas Miller, Monty Criswell, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and others. At his home in San Antonio, Texas, USA, of heart failure


Freddy Powers
(84), singer, songwriter, musician and producer who worked with Merle Haggard on such hits as 'I Always Get Lucky With You', 'A Friends In California', 'Let's Chase Each Other Around The Room Tonight', as well as producing Willie Nelson's album 'Somewhere Over The Rainbow'. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of Parkinson's Disease


Ned Miller
(90), singer-songwriter whose hits included 'From A Jack To A King' (covered by such stars as Elvis Presley, Ricky Van Shelton and Bobby Darin),  "Dark Moon" (receded by Gale Storm and Bonnie Guitar), "Do What You Do Well" and "Invisible Tears". In Medford, Oregon, USA, from heart failure


Guy Clark
(74), singer-songwriter whose hits included 'Desperados Waiting For A Train' and whose songs were recorded by such stars as Johnny Cash, Brad Paisley and Alan Jackson ('Out In The Parking Lot'), Steve Wariner and Kenny Chesney. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer


Johnny Sea
(75), singer-songwriter whose hits included 'Day For Decision' (a conservative response to Barry McGuire's 'Eve Of Destruction'), 'Nobody's Darling But Mine'. and 'My Old Faded Rose'. Near the town of West in Texas, when the plane he was piloting hit a cell-phone tower   


Emilio Navaira
(53), Tejano singer-songwriter whose crossovers included the country hit 'It's Not The End Of The World' and who was both a Grammy and a Latin Grammy Award winner. In New Braunfels, Texas, USA, following a heart attack


James King
(57), the Grammy-nominated bluegrass artist affectionately known as 'The Bluegrass Storyteller'. In Salem, Virginia, USA, from complications of cirrhosis of the liver


Lonnie Mack
(71), guitarist and composer whose hits include 'Memphis' and 'Wham!' who not only charted seven times on his own, but also played on sessions for James Brown, Freddie King, Hank Ballard and on the Doors' 'Morrison Hotel'. Rockabilly Hall Of Fame Member. International Guitar Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Smithville, Tennessee, USA, following a heart attack


Bob Tubert
(90), country songwriter whose hits include 'When You Loved Me', (Brenda Lee), the Sonny James hits 'You're The Only World I Know' and 'I'll Keep Holding On', 'Gardenias In Her Hair' (Marty Robbins), and 'Here Comes Heaven' (Eddy Arnold), along with country hits for Stonewall Jackson, Dolly Parton, Jerry Lee Lewis, Kitty Wells, Dave Dudley, Faron Young, Dottie West, Connie Smith, Ray Stevens, Cal Smith, Jim Ed Brown, Marie Osmond, Roy Clark , Grandpa Jones, Billy Walker and David Houston.

Although best-known as a country writer, he also wrote songs for Sam the Sham & The Pharaohs ('Ring Dang Doo'), The Letterman ('Our Winter Love'), Lou Rawls ('My Ancestors'), Bobby Vinton ('Satin Pillow'), Chuck Jackson & Maxine Brown ('Please Don't Hurt Me'), Steve Alaimo, Taj Mahal, Sandy Posey, Jimmy Cliff, Perry Como, Anita Bryant, Jackie Wilson, Ketty Lester and Ann-Margret as well as being a founding member of the Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI), while helping to establish Belmont University's music business program.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure


Prince
(57), singer, guitarist, bassist, keyboardist and drummer, whose hits include 'Soft And Wet', 'I Wanna Be Your Lover', 'Controversy', 'Let's Work', '1999', 'Little Red Corvette', 'Delirious', 'Let's Pretend We're Married', 'When Doves Cry', 'Let's Go Crazy', 'Purple Rain', 'I Would Die 4 U', 'Take Me With U', 'Raspberry Beret', 'Pop Life', 'America', 'A Love Bizarre', 'Kiss', 'Mountains', 'Anotherloverholenyohead', 'Sign Of The Times', 'If I Was Your Girlfriend', 'U Got the Look', 'I Could Never Take the Place of Your Man', 'Alphabet Street', 'I Wish U Heaven', 'Batdance', 'Partyman', 'Thieves In The Temple', 'Get Off', 'Cream', 'Diamonds & Pearls', 'Money Don't Matter 2 Night', 'My Name Is Prince', '7', 'The 'Morning Papers', 'Pink Cashmere', 'The Most Beautiful Girl In The World', 'Letitgo', and 'I Hate U'.

His songs have been recorded by Sinead O'Connor ('Nothing Compares 2 U'), The Bangles ('Manic Monday') and Tom Jones ('Kiss').

Winner of seven Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, and an Academy Award (for the film Purple Rain), he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member.

In Paisley Park, Minnesota, USA, of as yet undisclosed causes, but possibly as a result of an overdose of a pain-killing drug, taken to alleviate hip problems


Jack Hammer
(90), co-writer of the Jerry Lee Lewis classic 'Great Balls Of Fire', Wanda Jackson's 'Fujiyama Mama' and The Cadillacs' 'Peek A Boo', as well as being a former member of the Platters. He recorded many solo albums (he was known as the 'Twistin' King' in Europe in the '60s) as well as performing on Broadway in 'Bubblin' Brown Sugar' in the '70s. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure


Peter Andreoli
(74), songwriter who also performed with such hit groups as the Videls ('Mister Lonely'), the Trade Winds ('New York's A Lonely Town' and 'Mind Excursion'), the Mystics ('Hushabye') and the Innocence ('There's Got To Be A Word') whose career started in 1956, when he joined the Videls while in high school and met his future songwriting partner Vinnie Poncia. In 1964 they both moved to California to write for Phil Spector, penning 'Do I Love You' and 'The Best Part Of Breaking Up' for the Ronettes as well as songs for The Crystals,  before persuading Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller to release as a single their demo of 'New York's A Lonely Town'.  They also penned hits for other acts, including the theme to Elvis Presley's movie 'Harem Scarum'.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Rhode Island Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Providence, Rhode Island, USA, of cancer


Andy 'Thunderclap' Newman
(73), songwriter and keyboardist whose hits include 'Something In The Air'. At his home in London, UK, of unknown causes


Merle Haggard
(79), singer and songwriter whose 105 hits include I'm a Lonesome Fugitive', 'Branded Man', 'Bring Me Back Home', 'The Legend of Bonnie and Clyde', 'Mama Tried', 'Hungry Eyes', 'Workin' Man Blues',,'Okie from Muskogee', 'The Fightin' Side of Me', 'Daddy Frank', 'Carolyn', 'Grandma Harp', 'It's Not Love (But It's Not Bad)', 'I Wonder If They Ever Think of Me', 'Everybody's Had the Blues', 'If We Make It Through December', 'Things Aren't Funny Anymore', 'Old Man from the Mountain', 'Kentucky Gambler', 'Always Wanting You', 'Movin' On', 'It's All in the Movies', 'The Roots of My Raising', 'Cherokee Maiden', 'Bar Room Buddies' (with Clint Eastwood), 'I Think I'll Just Stay Here and Drink', 'My Favorite Memory', 'Big City', 'Yesterday's Wine' (with George Jones), 'Going Where the Lonely Go', 'You Take Me For Granted', 'Pancho And Lefty' (with Willie Nelson),  'That's The Way Love Goes', 'Someday When Things Are Good', 'Let's Chase Each Other Around the Room', 'A Place To Fall Apart' (with Janie Frickie), 'Natural High', and 'Twinkle, Twinkle Lucky Star'.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Country Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Bakersfield, California, USA, from pneumonia 


Leon Haywood
(74), singer, songwriter and record producer, whose started out as the keyboardist for Sam Cooke, before going solo after Cooke's death. His own hits include 'I Want'a Do Something Freaky To You', 'She's With Her Other Love', 'Keep It In The Family', 'Come An' Get Yourself Some' and 'Don't Push It Don't Force It', as well as writing and producing Carl Carlton's 'She's A Bad Mama Jama', and records for many artists on his own EveJim Records. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of unknown causes


Keith Emerson
(71), pianist and songwriter with the Nice and Emerson, Lake & Palmer, whose hits include 'Lucky Man' and 'From The Beginning'. In Santa Monica, California, USA, from a self-inflicted single gunshot wound


George Martin
(90), the man known as 'The Fifth Beatle', and an accomplished pianist, arranger, producer, conductor, audio engineer, and composer, who arranged and/or added music to many Beatles' songs. including, 'Yesterday' and 'Lovely Rita' as well as producing Matt Monro, Cilla Black, Gerry & The Pacemakers, Billy J. Kramer & the Dakotas, The Fourmost, David & Jonathan, The Action, The King's Singers, America, Jeff Beck, John Williams, Neil Sedaka, Ultravox, Kenny Rogers, Cheap Trick, Elton John and Celine Dion, as well as working with Dire Straits, Pete Townshend and Elton John

During a fifty year career, he was involved in 30 number-one hit singles in the United Kingdom and 23 number-one hits in the United States. Although he had learned music as a child, he started working as a quantity surveyor after leaving school and when he was seventeen, joined the Fleet Air Ar becoming a commissioned officer. After the war, he worked for the BBC's classical music department, before joining EMI in 1950.

His early productions were singles and LPs for such comedians as Peter Sellers, Spike Milligan, Bernard Cribbins, Charlie Drake, Terry Scott, Bruce Forsyth, Michael Bentine, Dudley Moore, Flanders and Swann, Lance Percival, Joan Sims, and Bill Oddie.

After these successes, he had a number 1 hit with The Temperance Seven, as well as hits by Jerry Lordan, Shane Fenton and Matt Monro. In May 1962, he was introduced to Brian Epstein, a Liverpool department store director who was managing a local group, The Beatles, and it was Martin who signed the act to Parlophone Records later that year.

In his sleep, at his home in London, England


Steve Young
(73), singer-songwriter, ('Seven Bridges Road' for the Eagles, and 'Lonesome, On'ry, And Mean' for Waylon Jennings), whose songs have been recorded by Eddie Arnold, Hank Williams Jr, Shooter Jennings, Joan Baez, Uncle Josh Graves, Ricochet and Dolly Parton. In Nashville, Tennessee, following a brain injury caused by a fall.


David Egan
(61), songwriter and musician whose tunes were recorded by such stars as Etta James, Solomon Burke, Percy Sledge, Tab Benoit, Irma Thomas, Marcia Ball, Marc Broussard and Joe Cocker. In Lafayette, Louisiana, USA, of lung cancer


Jimmy Bain
(68), songwriter and musician who worked with Rainbow and Dio, as well as co-writing songs with Phil Lynott both for the band Thin Lizzie and for Lynott's solo career. Amongst his songs were 'Old Town', a hit for both Lynott and The Corrs, 'Rainbow In The Dark', for the band Dio, and 'Stars' for 'Hear 'n Aid', the charity he helped to found. Of cancer, while on a cruise with Def Leppard's 'Hysteria On The High Seas' tour 


Colin Vearncombe
(53), singer-songwriter who performed under the name Black. Amongst his hits were the self-composed 'Sweetest Smile', and 'Wonderful Life' which has been used in a large number of advertising campaigns, as well as being covered by Tina Cousins and Katie Melua. In Cork, Ireland, following a motoring accident


Paul Kantner
(74), musician, singer and songwriter who co-founded both Jefferson Airplane and Jefferson Starship and whose hit songs include  'The Ballad Of You And Me And Pooneil', 'Watch Her Ride', 'Crown Of Creation', 'Run Around', 'We Can Be Together', 'Today', 'Volunteers' 'Let Me In', and 'America'.  In San Francisco, California, USA, following a heart attack


Maurice White
(74), drummer, songwriter, producer and founding member of Earth, Wind & Fire. who worked as a teenager as a session drummer at Chess Records for such acts as the Impressions, Etta James, Muddy Waters and the Dells. In 1969, he formed the Salty Peppers before moving to Los Angeles and evolving the Peppers into Earth, Wind & Fire, whose hits which he penned, include  'Love Is Life', 'Mighty Mighty', 'Devotion', 'Shining Star', 'That's The Way Of The World', 'Sing A Song', 'September' and 'Boogie Wonderland'.

In addition, he also produced artists like the Emotions, Deniece Williams, Barbra Streisand and Neil Diamond. 

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. Vocal Group Hall Of Fame Member. Songwriters Hall Of Fame member. In Los Angeles, California, USA from Parkinson's Disease


Kim Williams
(68), songwriter who penned hits for Garth Brooks ('Ain't Goin' Down Till The Sun Comes Up' and 'Papa Loved Mama'), Joe Diffie ('If The Devil Danced In Empty Pockets'), Rascal Flatts, Randy Travis ('Three Wooden Crosses'), Keith Anderson ('Pickin' Wildflowers'), Brooks & Dunn ('Honky Tonk Truth'), George Jones ('Beer Run'), David Kersh ('Goodnight Sweetheart'), Reba McEntire ('The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter') and George Strait ('Overnight Male').

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member.  In Miami, Florida, USA, following a heart attack


Jimmie Haskell
(79), arranger, composer and songwriter, whose career earned him three Grammy Awards, one Primetime Emmy Award, two Primetime Emmy Award Nominations, three Clio Awards, two Addy Awards and one Cable Car Award. In addition, he composed music for 31 feature films, 32 TV movies and 445 TV episodes, including 'The Matrix', 'Three Kings', 'Grace Of My Heart', 'Pulp Fiction', 'Hotshots', 'Married To The Mob', 'When Harry Met Sally', 'Almost Famous', 'The Color Purple', 'Fools Rush In', 'Mulholland Falls', 'Love Potion #9', 'Ferris Bueller's Day Off', 'The West Wing', 'Bewitched', 'Hollywood Squares' and 'Ode To Billy Joe'.

He also arranged such hits as 'If You Leave Me Now' for Chicago, 'Ode To Billy Joe' for Bobby Gentry, and 'Bridge Over Troubled Waters' for Simon & Garfunkel as well as producing 135 Gold and/or Platinum albums for such stars as Steely Dan, Barbra Streisand, Tina Turner, Elvis Presley, Kenny Rankin, Simon and Garfunkel, The Bee Gees, Blondie, Pat Boone, Glen Campbell, Sam Cooke, Chicago, Crosby, Stills & Nash, Bobby Darin, Mac Davis, Neil Diamond, Fats Domino, The Doobie Brothers, Jose Feliciano, Dan Fogelberg, Bobbie Gentry, Foreigner, The Four Tops, The Grassroots, Engelbert Humperdinck, Michael Jackson, Etta James, Billy Joel,  B.B. King,  Gladys Knight, The Lettermen, Barry Manilow, Bette Midler, Ricky Nelson, Aaron Neville, Wayne Newton, Laura Nyro and Minnie Riperton.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member.  In New York City. USA from heart failure 


Dan Hicks
(74), singer-songwriter best known for 'I Scare Myself',  'How Can I Miss You When You Won't Go Away?'  and 'Canned Music'.At his home in Mill Valley, California, USA, from throat and liver cancer


David Bowie
(69), singer-songwriter and record producer whose career stretched from the early 1960's up until his death, involving sales of more than 150 million records including such classics as 'Space Oddity', 'The Jean Genie', 'Life on Mars?', 'Sorrow', 'Rebel Rebel', 'Young Americans', 'Golden Years', 'Sound and Vision', ''Heroes', 'John, I'm Only Dancing (Again)', 'Ashes to Ashes', 'Fashion', 'Under Pressure' (with Queen), 'Peace on Earth/Little Drummer Boy' (with Bing Crosby), 'Let's Dance', 'China Girl', 'Modern Love',  'Blue Jean', 'This Is Not America' (with the Pat Metheny Group), 'Absolute Beginners', 'Jump They Say', 'Ziggy Stardust', 'Arnold Layne' (with David Gilmour), 'Where Are We Now?', 'Blackstar' and 'Lazarus'. 

In his early years, he was a member of Davie Jones And The King Bees ('Liza Jane'), The Manish Boys ('I Pity The Fool'), The Lower Third ('You've Got A Habit Of Leaving'), The Buzz ('Do Anything You Say'), The Riot Squad and Tin Machine and also worked with Lou Reed, Brian Eno, Iggy Pop, Mick Jagger ('Dancing In The Street'), The Pet Shop Boys ('Hallo Spaceboy'), Arcade Fire, David Gilmour, Marianne Faithfull ('I Got You Babe') and Mott The Hoople. As an actor, he appeared in such films as 'The Man Who Fell To Earth', 'The Hunger', 'The Last Temptation Of Christ' and 'Just A Gigolo'. He also wrote the music and acted in the movie 'Absolute Beginners'.

Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In New York City. USA, from cancer

Songwriter Obituaries 2015


Mick Lynch
(56), songwriter for and founder of the London-based punk band Stump, whose songs include 'Charlton Heston', 'Buffalo' and 'Tupperware Stripper'. A former member of Microdisney, Lynch, born in Limerick, Ireland, moved to Cork at an early age before breaking onto the London scene with Stump in 1983. In Cork, Ireland, from cancer


Stevie Wright
(68), also known as Little Stevie, musician and songwriter and former lead singer with the Easybeats, whose hits include 'Friday on My Mind', 'She's So Fine', 'Wedding Ring', 'Women (Make You Feel Alright)', 'Come and See Her', 'I'll Make You Happy', and 'Sorry'. Long regarded as one of Australia's most important rock music personalities, he was born in Leeds, England, before moving to Melbourne, Australia at the age of nine. In Moruya, Australia, from cancer


Ian Fraser Kilmister
(Lemmy) (70), singer, songwriter and guitarist, who played with The Sundowners, The Rainmakers, The Motown Sect, The Rockin' Vickers ('It's Alright'), Sam Gopal ('Horse'), Opal Butterfly, Hawkwind ('Silver Machine' and 'Urban Guerrilla') and Motorhead ('Ace Of Spades' and 'Snaggletooth'). He also worked with The Damned, Robert Calvert ('Ejection' and 'Lord Of The Hornets'), Slash and Wendy O. Williams ('Stand By Your Man') and well as writing songs for The Ramones and Ozzy Osbourne. At his home in Los Angeles, California, USA, from cancer


Natalie Cole
(65), singer-songwriter and daughter of Nat King Cole. Although better known as a singer, she was, like her father, (a prolific songwriter whose tunes include 'Keeping A Light', 'Beautiful Dreamer', 'Annie Mae', 'Hold On', 'Peaceful Living', 'Sophisticated Lady', 'La Costa' and 'Your Eyes' In Los Angeles, California, USA, from congestive heart failure


Wesley Burrowes
(85), songwriter, author and playwright, whose songs include 'If I Could Choose', Ireland's second-placed entry in the 1967 Eurovision Song Contest. In Bray, Wicklow, Ireland, from cancer


Troy Shondell
(76), singer-songwriter, whose hits include 'Kissin' At The Drive In' and 'The Trance' (under the name Gary Shelton), and 'This Time' (under the name Troy Shondell) which sold in excess of four million copies. From the 1970's onwards, he worked as a songwriter, producer and music publishing agent. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, from complications of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease


Albert Elias
(86), songwriter whose work includes the score from the 1973 movie 'Gordon's War' as well as such left-field classics as 'My Daddy Is A Woman'. In Miami, Florida, USA, of cancer


Red Simpson
(81), singer-songwriter whose hits include ''Gonna Have Love' (Buck Owens), 'Roll, Truck, Roll' (Tommy Collins), 'Sam's Place' (Buck Owens), 'Lucky Old Colorado' (Merle Haggard) plus a string of songs for himself including  'Truck Driver's Heaven' and 'The Flying Saucer Man and the Truck Driver'. In Bakersfield, California, USA from heart failure


Elizabeth Swados
(65), composer and director for the musicals  'Runaways' and 'Doonesbury', who also composed music for the films 'Four Friends' and 'Seize The Day'. In New York, USA, following surgery for oesophageal cancer 


Pablo Manavello
(65), songwriter, arranger and producer whose work was instrumental in the careers of Latin superstars Ricardo Montaner, Olga Tañón, Chayanne and Ricky Martin. In Miami, Florida, USA, following a heart attack


Marion James
(81), singer and songwriter, known as 'Nashville's Queen of the Blues'. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, following a stroke 


Clarence Reid
(76), singer-songwriter whose songs were recorded by such acts as KC & the Sunshine Band, Sam & Dave, Irma Thomas and Bobby Byrd, but who also released more than thirty solo albums under the name Blowfly. In Miami, Florida, USA, from cancer


Glenn Frey
(67), singer-songwriter and founder of The Eagles, and former member of The Subterraneans, The Four Of Us, The Mushrooms, The Heavy Metal Kids, and Longbranch Pennywhistle. His hits include 'Take It Easy', 'Peaceful Easy Feeling', 'Tequila Sunrise', 'Already Gone', 'Lyin' Eyes', 'New Kid in Town' and 'Heartache Tonight' (all with The Eagles), plus such solo hits as 'The One You Love', 'Smuggler's Blues', 'Sexy Girl', 'The Heat Is On', 'You Belong to the City', 'True Love', 'Soul Searchin'' and 'Livin' Right'.

Also an actor, he played roles in the NBC-TV series 'Miami Vice', 'Wiseguy" and "South Of Sunset' and in the movie 'Jerry McGuire'.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. In New York, USA, from complications of rheumatoid arthritis


Wayne Bickerton
(74), singer, guitarist and songwriter, whose hit songs (many written with his childhood friend Tony Waddington) include 'Sugar Baby Love' for the Rubettes, 'Nothing But A Heartache' for The Flirtations, 'Can't Stop Loving You' for Tom Jones, and 'Candy Kisses' for Mac and Katie Kissoon. He started his musical career while still a teenager, working with such acts as Steve Bennett & The Syndicate, The Bobby Bell Rockers, The Remo Four, Lee Curtis & The All Stars, The Pete Best Four, Petula Clark, Tom Jones and Kenny Everett, as well as producing Giles & Fripp, The Focal Point, Pacific Drift, Granny's Intentions, Mongrel and World Of Oz.

In 1967, he joined Deram Records as a producer, before moving in 1970 to Polydor Records as Head of A&R, where he signed such acts as Slade, The New Seekers and Cat Stevens. He later went on to found State Records and Odyssey Studios, before becoming first a director of the PRS, and later Chairman of SESAC International, taking charge of all its business activities outside of the United States.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. At his home in Hertfordshire, England, after a short illness


Snuff Garrett
(76), record producer who started his career as a DJ on KDAV in Lubbock, Texas during which period he became a close friend of Buddy Holly and probably broadcast the first tribute program to the late singer following the star's death in an aircrash in February 1959.  Four months later, he joined Liberty Records in Los Angeles as a producer, his first production being Johnny Burnette's "Setting The Woods On Fire". He went on to even greater success with such acts as Bobby Vee, Gene McDaniels, Buddy Knox, Walter Brennan, Gary Lewis & the Playboys, Del Shannon and later (after leaving Liberty) Cher and Sonny & Cher. His million-selling productions introduced such songs as "Rubber Ball", "Take Good Care Of My Baby" and "The Night Has A Thousand Eyes" with Bobby Vee, "This Diamond Ring" with Gary Lewis & the Playboys, Johnny Burnette's "You're 16", "The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia" (Vicki Lawrence), Gene McDaniels' "A Hundred Pounds Of Clay",  Tanya Tucker's "Lizzie And The Rainman", and "Gypsies, Tramps & Thieves", "Half Breed" and "Dark Lady" for Cher.

During this period, he also charted six times under the "50 Guitars Of Tommy Garrett" name, but which actually featured the guitar prowess of Liberty session musician Tommy Tedesco, and he was also responsible for hiring Phil Spector to Liberty Records and employing Leon Russell as his assistant. At the height of his success, he left Liberty to set up Viva Records, whose first signing was the songwriter Sonny Curtis, producing several hit singles and two albums for the former Buddy Holly guitarist as well as a series of country hits for Clint Eastwood, Tanya Tucker, Eddie Rabbitt, David Frizzell and Shelly West. In 1976, he bought the rights to 800 old Republic and RKO Films titles and quickly built a multi-million dollar business in the early days of home video. In 1983, he retired to live at his ranch, concentrating on one of his hobbies, Western Art. At his ranch near Sonoita, Arizona, USA, of heart failure.


Luigi Creatore
(93), songwriter and producer, whose hits (in collaboration with his cousin Hugo Peretti) include "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" for the Tokens, "Honeycomb", "Kisses Sweeter Than Wine", "Oh-Oh, I'm Falling In Love Again" and "Secretly" for Jimmie Rodgers, "Can't Help Falling in Love" and "Wild In The Country" for Elvis Presley, "I Will Follow Him" for Little Peggy March, and "Chain Gang", "Twistin' The Night Away" and "Wonderful World" for Sam Cooke.

He also wrote a well-received novel "The World Is Mine" based on his World War 2 experiences, as well as being involved in such Broadway successes as "Maggie Flynn" starring Shirley Jones, and "Bubbling Brown Sugar" for which he, and Hugo Peretti, known collectively as "Hugo & Luigi", received a Grammy Award.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Boca Raton, Florida, USA, from pneumonia


Don Chapel
(84), singer, songwriter and former husband of country vocalist Tammy Wynette. Don Chapel, whose songs for his wife include "All Night Long", "My Heart Is Soakin' Wet", "Together We Stand, Divided We Fall" and "Joey", also penned hits for such country stars as George Jones ("When the Grass Grows Over Me", "From Here To The Door", "Let's Get Together" and "Call Off The Party Tonight"), Ray Price ("Misty Morning Rain"), Eddy Arnold ("Baby That's Living"), Charlie Louvin ("Loving You Is A Way Of Life For Me") and Doug Kershaw ("Feed It To The Fish"), as well as songs for Conway Twitty, Ernest Tubb, Kitty Wells, Faron Young, Rhonda Vincent, Jerry Lee Lewis, Lynn Anderson, Johnny Paycheck, The Osborne Brothers and Webb Pierce. In Madison, Tennessee, USA, following a long battle with heart failure and pneumonia


Ted Harris
(78), songwriter whose hits include Charley Pride's "The Happiness Of Having You" and "Crystal Chandelier", Dottie West's "Paper Mansions", Ferlin Husky's "Once" and the Glen Campbell/Steve Wariner duet "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle". Born in Lakeland, Florida, he gave up journalism to move to Nashville in 1957 in the hope of meeting his idol, Hank Snow who shortly afterwards recorded two of his compositions "Chasin' A Rainbow" and "My Lucky Friend". In 1965, he decided to take up songwriting full-time, co-founding the Harbot Music Publishing company. Later that year, Carl Belew recorded "Crystal Chandelier", which became a top-10 smash and was subsequently recorded by dozens of others, including Mac Wiseman, Louis Armstrong, Dickey Lee, Johnny Russell, Billie Jo Spears, Charley Pride, Warner Mack and Vic Dana, who made it a pop hit.

Other songs were also recorded by such stars as Crystal Gayle, Leroy Van Dyke, Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash, Charlie Rich, The Wilburn Brothers, Cal Smith, Conway Twitty, Floyd Cramer, Jerry Wallace, Ray Pillow, Kitty Wells, Wilma Burgess, Porter Wagoner, Vern Gosdin, Johnny Duncan, Charlie Louvin, Jean Shepard, Margie Singleton and Connie Smith, making him the most-awarded country songwriter in the history of SESAC.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame Member. At his home in Lewisburg, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure


Don Pfrimmer
(78), songwriter whose hit-making career stretched almost forty years. A former teacher, whose hits include Tim McGraw's "All I Want Is a Life", Diamond Rio's "Meet In The Middle",  Lonestar's "My Front Porch Looking In", Mickey Gilley's "The Power Of Positive Drinking", and Ronnie Milsap's "She Keeps The Home Fires Burning" he published more than 450 songs recorded by such acts as Tanya Tucker, Jim & Jesse, Louise Mandrell, Don Williams, Lee Greenwood, Charlie Louvin, Keith Whitley, The Oak Ridge Boys, Lorrie Morgan, Porter Wagoner, Barbara Mandrell, Tammy Wynette, Michelle Wright, Billy Dean, George Jones, Rita Coolidge, Bryan White, Stephanie Bentley, Tim McGraw, Kevin Sharp, Doug Stone, Le Roy Parnell, Ronnie Milsap, Sylvia, Eddie Rabbitt, Eddy Raven, John Schneider and The Forester Sisters. Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, from  leukaemia


Tommy Overstreet

(78), singer-songwriter whose hits include 'Gwen (Congratulations)', 'I Don't Know You Anymore', 'Heaven Is My Woman's Love', 'Send Me No Roses', 'I'll Never Break These Chains', '(Jeannie Marie) You Were A Lady', 'If I Miss You Again Tonight', 'I'm a Believer', 'That's When My Woman Begins', 'If Love Was A Bottle Of Wine', 'Don't Go City Girl On Me', 'Yes, Ma'am', and 'Fadin' In, Fadin' Out'. A cousin of the singer Gene Austin, he started his career at Norman Petty's studio in Clovis, New Mexico, and for a period, managed Dot Records in Nashville. At his home in  Hillsboro, Oregon, USA. after a long illness


Allen Toussaint
(77), songwriter, producer and arranger who wrote such classic hits as 'Mother-In-Law' for Ernie K Doe, 'Southern Nights' for Glen Campbell, 'Working In The Coal Mine' (Lee Dorsey), 'Java' (Al Hirt) and 'Whipped Cream', a hit for Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass but probably better known from its use on TV's 'The Dating Game'. He also produced such artists as B.J. Thomas, Dr John, The Meters, and 'Lady Marmalade', a hit for Labelle as well as working with Paul McCartney on the 1975 'Venus And Mars' album.

Songwriters Hall Of Fame inductee, Blues Hall Of Fame member, Louisiana Music Hall of Fame inductee, and International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Madrid, Spain, following a heart attack

John Fisher
songwriter and instrumentalist, whose songs include ''I Hope It Keeps On Raining', 'Texas' and 'Roseland Romance'. Life Member of the International Songwriters Association. In Thorpe Bay, Essex, England, after a short illness


P.F. Sloan
(70), songwriter whose songs include 'Eve Of Destruction' (Barry McGuire), 'A Must To Avoid' (Herman's Hermits), 'You Baby (The Turtles) 'Secret Agent Man' (Johnny Rivers), 'Another Day, Another Heartache' (The Fifth Dimension),'Things I Should Have Said', 'Where Were You When I Needed You' and 'Wake Up, Wake Up' (The Grass Roots), and whose songs were recorded by such acts as Jan & Dean, The Mamas And The Papas, Mel Torme, Bruce Willis and The Ventures. He even had a song ('P F Sloan) written about him by songwriter Jimmy Webb.

An International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. At his home in Los Angeles, California, USA, of pancreatic cancer.


Winfield Scott
(95), songwriter and lead singer with The Cues, who went on to write the Elvis Presley hits 'Return To Sender', 'Devil In Disguise' and 'One Broken Heart For Sale', as well as LaVern Baker's 'Tweedlee Dee,' Connie Francis' 'Many Tears Ago' and Bill Haley's 'Burn That Candle', and whose songs were also recorded by Pat Boone, Peggy Lee The Mills Brothers and Conway Twitty. In New York City, USA, of heart failure


Jim Diamond
(64), singer-songwriter and former vocalist with such bands as Silver". The Method, Jade, Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated, Gully Foyle, Bandit, BACCO, Slick Diamond, and PhD, and whose solo hits include "I Won't Let You Down", "I Should Have Known Better" and the theme song from Boon, "Hi Ho Silver". In his sleep at his home in London, UK


Frankie Ford
(76), the singer and songwriter best known for the 1959 hit "Sea Cruise". Ford, a Louisiana Music Hall Of Fame Inductee whose other chart songs include "Alimony", "Time After Time" and "Seventeen", also owned Briarmeade Records. At his home in Gretna, Louisiana, USA following a long illness


Billy Joe Royal
(73), singer-songwriter who started his career as the vocalist on demos of songs written by his friend, Joe South, one of which was "Down In The Boondocks", the demo of which so impressed Columbia Records that they offered Royal a contract, releasing his version of the song in 1965. Other pop hits include "I Knew You When", "Hush", "Yo-Yo" (later covered by the Osmonds), "Cherry Hill Park" and "Under The Boardwalk". In the eighties, he turned to country music, scoring hits with such songs as "Burned Like A Rocket", "I'll Pin A Note On Your Pillow", "Tell It Like It Is", and "Till I Can't Take It Anymore" . In his sleep at his home in Morehead City, North Carolina, USA


Billy Sherrill
(79), producer and songwriter, whose hit compositions include such classics as 'Almost Persuaded', 'The Door', 'Every Time You Touch Me (I Get High)', 'Good Lovin'(Makes It Right)', 'I Don't Wanna Play House', 'I Love My Friend', 'Kids Say The Darndest Things', 'The Most Beautiful Girl', 'My Elusive Dreams', 'Stand By Your Man', 'There's A Party Goin' On', 'Til I Can Make It On My Own', 'A Very Special Love Song' and 'What My Woman Can't Do'.

Billy Sherrill, once described as 'country's answer to Phil Spector' also produced such stars as Tammy Wynette, George Jones, Charlie Rich, Shelby Lynne, Marty Robbins, Ray Charles, Elvis Costello, Johnny Paycheck, Tanya Tucker, Johnny Cash, Janie Fricke, Barbara Mandrell, Lacy J. Dalton, Ray Conniff, Bobby Vinton, Bob Luman, Johnny Duncan, Jody Miller, Moe Bandy, Joe Stampley, Charlie Walker, Barbara Fairchild, Andy Williams, Cliff Richard, Mickey Gilley, Major Lance, and David Allan Coe.

Member Of The International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame, The Country Music Hall of Fame and the Musicians Hall Of Fame. At his home in Nashville, Tennessee. USA, of heart failure


Daron Norwood
(49), singer and songwriter who penned the Keith Whitley tribute 'Little Boy Lost' in addition to charting as a performer in his own right. A native of Lubbock, Texas, Norwood rose to fame in 1993 with 'If It Wasn't For Her I Wouldn't Have You' and 'Cowboys Don't Cry', going on to have a string of hit singles, during the early 1990's. However, Darron's alcoholism led him to give up singing in 1995, and apart from the occasional foray into the studios, he concentrated on his 'Keep It Straight' program which campaigned against alcohol abuse. At his apartment in Hereford, Texas, USA. of heart failure


Danny Sembello
(52), songwriter and brother of singer and musician, Michael Sembello, who penned hits for The Pointer Sisters ('Neutron Dance'), Chaka Khan, Patti LaBelle ('Stir It Up'), Irene Cara, Rene & Angela and Jeffrey Osborne, as well as producing George Benson and Pebbles. In 1986, he won a Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media, for his contributions to the 'Beverly Hills Cop' soundtrack. In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, by drowning while swimming in the Schuylkill River, following the Hidden Rivers Blues Festival in Manayunk


Gary Richrath
(65), songwriter and guitarist for the rock band REO Speedwagon who wrote most of the band's hits, including 'Golden Country', 'Ridin' The Storm Out', 'Son Of A Poor Man', 'Flying Turkey Trot', 'Only The Strong Survive' and 'Take It On the Run'. At his home in Peoria, Illinois, USA from heart failure


Buddy Buie
(74), songwriter whose hits include Tommy Roe's "Party Girl" as well as a series of hits for Classics 1V, including  "Spooky", "Stormy", "Traces", "Everyday With You Girl", and "What Am I Crying For?". In 1972, he formed The Atlanta Rhythm Section, and in addition to recording and producing their records, also wrote most of their songs. Later hits include "Rock Bottom" for Wynonna Judd and "Mr. Midnight" for Garth Brooks. In Dothan, Alabama, USA, following a heart attack


Wayne Carson
(72), songwriter who wrote Elvis Presley's 'Always On My Mind', a song which returned to Number 1 on two further occasions via The Pet Shop Boys and Willie Nelson. Carson recalled writing 'Always On My Mind' in just ten minutes at his kitchen table in Missouri, before seeing it recorded by more than one hundred acts including Brenda Lee, Michael Buble, Julio Iglesias, The Stylistics, West End Girls, Johnny Cash & Willie Nelson and John Wesley Ryles.

Other hits include 'The Letter', 'Soul Deep' and 'Neon Rainbow' all for The Box Tops, 'No Love At All' for BJ Thomas. 'Somebody Like Me' for Eddy Arnold, 'Keep On' for Bruce Channel, 'The Clown' for Conway Twitty, 'Barstool Mountain' for Moe Bandy, 'Carryin' On' for Tina Turner, 'Something's Wrong In California' for Waylon Jennings, 'Hollywood' for Alabama and 'A Horse Called Music' for Willie Nelson and also Randy Travis.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, from heart failure


Van Alexander
(100), who wrote Ella Fitzgerald's first million seller 'A-Tisket, A-Tasket', before going on to compose music for such television shows as  'Bewitched', 'I Dream Of Jeannie', 'Dennis The Menace', 'The Wacky World Of Jonathan Winters' and 'The Dean Martin Show'. In a career which spanned 60 years, he scored such movies as 'Baby Face Nelson', 'The Big Operator' and 'The Private Lives Of Adam And Eve' while also recording such acts as  Kay Starr, Dakota Staton, Paul Whiteman, Benny Goodman, Dinah Shore, Doris Day, and Peggy Lee. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure


Ernie Maresca
(76), songwriter and winger who had his own solo hit with "Shout! Shout! (Knock Yourself Out)", but who will also be remembered for penning most of Dion's classics. Maresca was a native of the Bronx in New York, when in 1958, Dion heard "No One Knows" a song Maresca had written, and promptly recorded it with his group the Belmonts. The record went to 19 on the pop charts, after which, Ernie concentrated on songwriting, penning such hits as "Runaround Sue", "The Wanderer", "Lovers Who Wander" and "Donna The Prima Donna". He also penned "Runaround" for the Regents, "Whenever A Teenager Cries" for Reparata and the Delrons, "Hey Dean, Hey Jean" for Dean & Jean, "Party Girl" for Bernadette Carroll and the Jimmie Rodgers classic "Child of Clay".

Later, he acted as head of publicity for Laurie Records, retiring to Florida in 2002.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Miami, Florida, USA, from heart failure


Michael Masser
(74), songwriter who composed several Number 1 hits and helped launch the career of singer Whitney Houston. A Chicago stockbroker before he turned to songwriting, his first success was "Touch Me In The Morning," which was a Number 1 hit for Diana Ross in 1973. Other hits include  "Greatest Love Of All", "Didn't We Almost Have It All", "Saving All My Love For You" and "All At Once" (for Whitney Houston), along with "Hold Me" (Teddy Pendergrass and Whitney Houston), "Tonight, I Celebrate My Love" (Roberta Flack and Peabo Bryson), "If Ever You're In My Arms Again" (Peabo Bryson), "In Your Eyes" (Jeffrey Osborne, George Benson), "Nothing's Gonna Change My Love For You" (George Benson, Glenn Medeiros), "Miss You Like Crazy" (Natalie Cole) and "Someone That I Used To Love" (Natalie Cole).

He  was nominated for an Academy Award in 1976 for "Theme From Mahogany (Do You Know Where You're Going To)".

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. At his home in Rancho Mirage, California, USA, of heart failure.


Roy C. Bennett
(97), songwriter who with his co-writer and childhood friend Sid Tepper, penned more than 300 songs, including 40 for Elvis, as well as material for The Beatles, Carl Perkins, Frank Sinatra, Perry Como and Eartha Kitt. These include 'Red Roses For A Blue Lady', the Dean Martin classic 'Naughty Lady Of Shady Lane' and most of Presley's 'Blue Hawaii' movie soundtrack.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Queens, New York, USA, from heart failure


Sid Tepper
(95), songwriter whose hits, mainly written with Roy C Bennett include "Red Roses For A Blue Lady", and whose songs have been recorded by  Elvis Presley ("Once Is Enough"), Cliff Richard ("The Young Ones"), Tony Bennett,  Guy Lombardo And His Royal Canadians, Rosemary Clooney, Peggy Lee, Wayne Newton, Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, Sarah Vaughn, Vic Dana, Perry Como, Jeff Beck and Dean Martin.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In New York City, USA, of heart failure


Don Robertson
(92), pianist and songwriter whose career started with the whistling instrumental "The Happy Whistler", but who as a songwriter penned such classics as "I Really Don't Want To Know" (Les Paul & Mary Ford, Eddy Arnold, Elvis and Tommy Edwards), "Ringo" (Lorne Greene), "Please Help Me, I'm Falling" (Hank Locklin), "I Love You More And More Every Day" (Al Martino) and "Anything That's Part Of You" (Elvis Presley).

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. In Santa Monica, California, USA, from heart failure


Ben E. King
(76), singer-songwriter and former lead singer with The Drifters, whose solo hits include "Stand By Me", (voted one of the Songs of the Century by the Recording Industry Association of America), "Amor", "I (Who Have Nothing") and "Spanish Harlem". As lead singer with the Drifters, he scored with the self-written "There Goes My Baby", as well as "Save The Last Dance For Me" and "This Magic Moment", while other hits include "Don't Play That Song (You Lied)", "Seven Letters", "How Can I Forget", "On the Horizon", "Young Boy Blues", "First Taste of Love", "Here Comes the Night", "Ecstasy", "That's When It Hurts". "What is Soul?", "Tears, Tears, Tears" and "Supernatural Thing", giving him a total of 38 Top 40 entries between 1959 and 1986.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In  Hackensack, New York, USA, following a heart attack


Lynn Annette Ripley
(67), singer-songwriter whose hits under the stage name of Twinkle include "Terry" and "Golden Lights". On the Isle of Wight, UK, of cancer


James Horner
(61), composer and songwriter whose film scores include "Titanic", "Star Trek II", "Braveheart" "Avatar", "Apollo 13", "Mighty Joe Young", "An American Tail", "The Land Before Time", "How The Grinch Stole Christmas", "The Perfect Storm", "Enemy At The Gates", "The Mask Of Zorro", "The Legend Of Zorro", "House Of Sand And Fog", "Bicentennial Man" and "A Beautiful Mind".

His score for "Titanic" is the best -selling orchestral soundtrack of all time, and in a career which stretched forty years, Horner won two Academy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, three Satellite Awards, and three Saturn Awards, and was nominated for three British Academy Film Awards. Near Santa Barbara, California, USA, when the plane he was piloting crashed


Johnny Keating
(88), trombonist, songwriter, producer and arranger whose hits include "Theme from Z-Cars" and "Bunny Hop", and who worked with Ted Heath, Eden Kane, Adam Faith, Petula Clark, Sammy Davis Jr and Anthony Newley. In London, UK, of heart failure


Brian Carman
(69), guitarist with the Chantays and writer of "Pipeline", one of the biggest instrumentals of the surf era. In Santa Ana, California, USA. from complications from Crohn's Disease


Jackie Trent
(76), singer-songwriter whose hits include "I Couldn't Live Without Your Love", "Don't Sleep In The Subway","Colour My World",  "If You Love Me, Really Love Me", "Where Are You Now (My Love)," and "Neighbours", the theme tune from the television series. Former husband of songwriter Tony Hatch. In Minorca, Spain, from cancer


Jørgen Ingmann
(89), guitarist-songwriter, who had the US hit version of "Apache" as well as the 1963 Eurovision winner "Dansevise". In Copenhagen, Denmark, from heart failure


Kim Fowley
(75), producer, singer and songwriter, who co-wrote songs for Helen Reddy, Leon Russell, Kiss, Alice Cooper and Kris Kristofferson, as well as managing and producing such acts as The Sleepwalkers, The Runaways, The Murmaids, The Modern Lovers, The Germs and Flash Cadillac & The Continental Kids.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of cancer


Ervin Drake
(95), songwriter of such classic hits as "It Was A Very Good Year" and "I Believe", who penned songs for  Duke Ellington,  Billie Holiday, Diana Ross, Perry Como, Frankie Laine, Steve Lawrence, Barbra Streisand, Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley. Songwriter's Hall Of Fame Inductee.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Great Neck, New York, USA, of cancer


Joe B. Mauldin
(74), bassist, audio engineer and songwriter, whose songs for Buddy Holly include "I'm Gonna Love You Too" and "Well Alright", and lifetime member of The Crickets ("That'll Be The Day", "Maybe Baby", "Oh, Boy!", "It's So Easy" and "Love's Made A Fool Of You"). Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee, West Texas Walk Of Fame Inductee and Musicians Hall Of Fame And Museum Inductee. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer


Rod McKuen
(81), poet, singer and songwriter whose songs include  "If You Go Away", "Jean", "The World I Used To Know", "Doesn't Anybody Know My Name" and "Seasons In The Sun" and whose compositions have been recorded by such acts as Barbra Streisand, Glenn Yarbrough, Dusty Springfield, Petula Clark, Waylon Jennings, Al Hirt, The Kingston Trio, Chet Baker, Johnny Cash, Perry Como, Andy Williams, Pete Fountain, Percy Faith and Johnny Mathis. In Beverly Hills, California, USA, of cancer


Rose Marie McCoy
(92), singer. songwriter and music publisher, who songs have been recorded by Elvis Presley ("I Beg Of You"), Little Willie John, The Eagles, Faye Adams ("It Hurts Me To My Heart"), Aretha Franklin, Ike & Tina Turner ("It's Gonna Work Out Fine"), Eddy Arnold, Nat King Cole, Little Esther, Lenny Welch, The Clovers, Ruth Brown and Big Maybelle ("Gabbin' Blues"). In Urbana, Illinois, USA, of heart failure

Songwriter Obituaries 2014


Don Covay
(76), singer and songwriter ("Pony Time" and "See Saw") as well as being a member of The Cherry Keys, The Rainbows, The Soul Clan and Don Covay And The Goodtimers ("Mercy Mercy") and whose songs have been recorded by Aretha Franklin ("Chain Of Fools"), Grant Green, Steppenwolf ("Sookie Sookie"), Gladys Knight & The Pips, Chubby Checker, Jerry Butler, Bobby Womack, Peter Wolf, Solomon Burke, The Rolling Stones, The Small Faces and Wilson Pickett ("I'm Gonna Cry"). Don Covay also worked with Little Richard and Jimi Hendrix. In  Orangeburg, South Carolina, USA, following a heart attack


Larry Henley
(77), singer and songwriter, whose hits include the Grammy Award winning "Wind Beneath My Wings", "I Love Bread And Butter", ""Til I Get It Right", "Lizzie And The Rainman", "He's A Heartache", and "Why Don't We Go Somewhere And Love", and whose songs have been recorded by Bette Midler, Judy Collins, Perry Como, Tammy Wynette, Tanya Tucker, Randy Travis, Barbara Streisand, Delbert McClinton, Lynn Anderson, The Carter Family and Kenny Rogers.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member and Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, from complications resulting from Parkinson's Disease


Lynsey de Paul
(66), singer-songwriter ("Rock Bottom", "There's No Place Like London" and "Hearts Of Gold")). International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In London, UK, following a brain haemorrhage


Alvin Stardust
(72), singer and songwriter ("My Coo Ca Choo", "Jealous Mind" and "I Feel Like Buddy Holly"), who also worked as Shane Fenton ("Cindy's Birthday" and "I'm A Moody Guy"). In Ifold, West Sussex, UK, of prostate cancer


Acker Bilk
(75), singer and clarinettist ("Stranger On The Shore", "Summer Set" and "That's My Home" ), who led the Paramount Jazz Band. In Bath, Somerset, UK, of cancer


Augusto Martelli
(74), composer, conductor and arranger ("Djamballa"), In Milan, Italy, of cancer


Dave Appell
(92), guitarist, engineer and arranger who led the Applejacks ("Rocka-Conga" and "The Mexican Hat Rock"), working with Charlie Gracie The Orlons, Chubby Checker, Dee Dee Sharp, Bobby Rydell and The Dovells, writing such hits as "Let's Twist Again," "Bristol Stomp," "Mashed Potato Time" and "South Street", before going on produce Tony Orlando and Dawn ("Knock Three Times" and "Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round the Old Oak Tree").

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, of heart failure


Al Byron
(72), songwriter of such hits as "Roses Are Red" (Bobby Vinton), "Happy Go Lucky Me" (Paul Evans and George Formby), "Forget Me Not" (Steve Wariner) and "Something Blue" (Elvis Presley). In Hollywood, California, of natural causes


Bob Montgomery
(77), songwriter and producer who recorded and performed with Buddy Holly as Buddy and Bob (co-writing Holly's hits  "Heartbeat" "Wishing" and "Love's Made A Fool Of You"), as well as "Back In Baby's Arms" for Patsy Cline, and "Misty Blue", which has become a crossover standard, having been recorded by Wilma Burgess, Eddie Arnold, Billie Jo Spears, Dorothy Moore, Joe Simon, and more than 200 other recording acts.

Other hits penned by him were "Somebody Else's Girl" (Billy Fury) and "Wind Me Up, Let Me Go" (Cliff Richard). He also produced such stars as Bobby Goldsboro ("Honey", which sold more than eight million copies), Buddy Knox, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard and Marty Robbins as well as publishing hits like "Behind Closed Doors", "Honey" and "The Wind Beneath My Wings",

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Lee's Summit, Missouri, USA, of Parkinson's disease


Udo Jόrgens
(80), singer, pianist and composer (Shirley Bassey's "Reach For The Stars", Matt Monro's "Walk Away," Bing Crosby's "Come Share The Wine,", and his own Eurovision winner, "Merci, Cherie"). In Munsterlingen, Switzerland, of heart failure


Bob Crewe
(83), songwriter, singer and producer who led The Bob Crewe Generation and went on to produce the Four Seasons. His songs have been recorded by Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons ("Big Girls Don't Cry", "Bye, Bye, Baby, Baby Goodbye", "Can't Take My Eyes Off You", "Girl Come Running", "Let's Hang On!", "My Eyes Adored You", "New Mexican Rose", "The Proud One", "Rag Doll", "Ronnie", "Save It For Me", "Silence Is Golden", "The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore" and "Swearin' To God"), Mitch Ryder And The Detroit Wheels, Herman's Hermits ("Silhouettes"), The Rays, Diane Renay, Freddy Cannon, Michael Jackson, Lesley Gore, Patti LaBelle Lady Marmalade ("Voulez-Vous Coucher Avec Moi Ce Soir"), Bobby Darin, Roberta Flack and Peabo Bryson.

In addition to his own solo career both as a vocalist and instrumentalist ("Music To Watch Girls By"), he is also credited as the lyricist for the hit musical "Jersey Boys".

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member.. Songwriter's Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Scarborough, Maine, USA, following a fall


Johnny Mann
(86), composer, arranger and singer who led The Johnny Mann Singers and worked with Johnny Burnette, The Crickets, Eddie Cochran, Nat King Cole, Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra, as well as being the musical director for the original Alvin And The Chipmunks TV show where he sang the voice of Theodore.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Anderson, South Carolina, USA, following a stroke


George Hamilton IV
also known as The International Ambassador of Country Music (77), songwriter and singer whose hits include "A Rose And A Baby Ruth", "Why Don't They Understand" and "Abilene". In Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, following a heart attack


Dale Ward
(74), singer and songwriter ("A Letter From Sherry" and "You Little Flirt"), who co-wrote Ronnie Dove's "They Can't Love Like You And Me". In Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA following a heart attack


Tim Johnson
(52), songwriter who wrote Daryle Singletary's "I Let Her Lie", Diamond Rio's "God Only Cries", Jimmy Wayne's "Do You Believe Me Now", Kellie Pickler's "Things That Never Cross A Man's Mind" and Tim Rushlow's "She Misses Him". In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer


George Riddle
(79), guitarist and songwriter, who worked with George Jones, The Jones Boys and Bill Carlisle and who wrote songs for Ray Charles, Tammy Wynette, Mickey Gilley, Del Reeves, Melba Montgomery and Margie Singleton. In Indianpolis, Indiana, USA, of cancer


Jimi Jamison
(63), singer, pianist and composer who wrote the theme song for TV's  "Baywatch" as well as being a member of Survivor ("The Moment Of Truth" and "Is This Love"). In Los Angeles, California, USA, following a heart attack


Arthur Smith
(93), musician and songwriter whose songs have been recorded by Chet Atkins, Tom Petty, Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash, The Statesmen Quartet, Al Hirt, Barbara Mandrell, Willie Nelson, The Oak Ridge Boys, Roy Orbison, The Statler Brothers and Boots Randolph. North Carolina Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Charlotte, North Carolina, USA, of heart failure


Peter Callander
(74), songwriter and record producer whose hits include "The Ballad Of Bonnie And Clyde" (Georgie Fame), "Hitchin' A Ride" (Vanity Fare), "Even The Bad Times Are Good" (The Tremeloes), "Goodbye Sam, Hello Samantha" (Cliff Richard), "Ragamuffin Man" (Manfred Mann), "Las Vegas" ""Is This The Way To Amarillo" and "I Did What I Did For Maria" (Tony Christie), "Daddy Don't You Walk So Fast"(Wayne Newton), and "Billy Don't Be A Hero" (Paper Lace and also Bo Donaldson).

He also penned hits for Cilla Black, Tom Jones, Frankie Vaughan, Shirley Bassey, Acker Bilk, Dana, Vic Damone, Sacha Distel, Joe Dolan, Val Doonican, Adam Faith,  Agnetha Fältskog, Wayne Fontana, Lulu, Marmalade,  Peter Noone, Gene Pitney, P J Proby, Charlie Rich, Dusty Springfield,  Bobby Rydell and Sandie Shaw.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Founder member of the Society Of Distinguished Songwriters (SODS). Director of PRS For Music. In London, UK, following a heart attack


Gerry Goffin
(75), songwriter whose hits include "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" and "What A Sweet Thing That Was" (The Shirelles), "Go Away Little Girl" (Steve Lawrence), "Point Of No Return" (Gene McDaniels), "Take Good Care Of My Baby", "How Many Tears", "Sharing You", "Walkin' With My Angel" and "Run To Him" (Bobby Vee), "Some Kind Of Wonderful", "When My Little Girl Is Smiling","At The Club" and "Up On The Roof" (The Drifters), "Halfway To Paradise" (Tony Orlando), "The Locomotion" and "Keep Your Hands Off My Baby" (Little Eva), "I Can't Stay Mad at You" (Skeeter Davis), "Hey Girl" (Freddie Scott), I Want To Stay Here" (Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme), "I'm Into Something Good" (Earl-Jean and Herman's Hermits), "Oh No Not My Baby" (Maxine Brown, Manfred Mann and Cher), "One Fine Day" (The Chiffons, Rita Coolidge and Carole King), "He's In Town" (The Tokens), "It Might As Well Rain Until September" and "Smackwater Jack" (Carole King), "You Make Me Feel Like A Natural Woman" (Aretha Franklin), "Pleasant Valley Sunday" and "Take a Giant Step" (The Monkees), "Goin' Back" (Dusty Springfield), "Don't Bring Me Down" (The Animals), "Just Once in My Life" and "Hung On You" (The Righteous Brothers), "This Little Girl" (Dion), "Her Royal Majesty" (James Darren), "Do You Know Where You're Going To" (Diana Ross), "Saving All My Love For You" (Whitney Houston), "Who Put the Bomp" (Barry Mann) and "Don't Ever Change" (The Crickets).

Previously married to songwriter Carole King, and father of Louise Goffin.

Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame Member. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of cancer


Pete Seeger
(94), singer and songwriter ("Where Have All The Flowers Gone?" and "Turn, Turn, Turn!"), who was a member of The Almanac Singers and The Weavers ("Goodnight, Irene") and who worked with Donovan, Sonny Terry, Brownie McGhee, Johnny Cash, John Mellencamp, Willie Nelson, Dave Matthews Buffy Sainte-Marie, Bruce Springsteen, Arlo Guthrie, Lee Hays, Woody Guthrie, The New Lost City Ramblers and Neil Young.

Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee, Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee and International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In New York City, USA, of natural causes


Franny Beecher
(92), guitarist and composer (""Goofin' Around" and "Shaky"), who worked with Bill Haley & His Comets, The Kingsmen, The Merri-Men, Buddy Greco And The Sharps and Benny Goodman. Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, of natural causes


Raymond Louis Kennedy
(67), singer, saxophonist producer and songwriter (he co-wrote The Beach Boys', "Sail On, Sailor" and The Babys' "Everytime I Think Of You") as well as being half of the duo Jon And Ray, and a member of Group Therapy. He worked with Kenny Gamble ("Number 5 Gemini"), Dizzy Gillespie, J. J. Johnson, Brenda Lee and Buddy Rich. In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, following a heart attack


Anna Gordy Gaye
(92), songwriter and co-founder of Anna Records who co-wrote The Originals' "Baby, I'm For Real" and Stevie Wonder's "What Christmas Means To Me". Sister of Motown Records founder Berry Gordy and wife of singer Marvin Gaye. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of natural causes


Steven Fromholz
(67), singer and songwriter (Willie Nelson's "I'd Have To Be Crazy"), who was half of the duo Frummox and who produced and wrote songs for Lyle Lovett as well as working with Manassas, Hoyt Axton, John Denver, Jerry Jeff Walker and Michael Nesmith, In Eldorado, Texas, USA, when he accidentally shot himself

Songwriter Obituaries 2013

Colonel Robert Morris
(58), also known as "The Man With The Golden Pen", drummer, singer and songwriter, who worked with Charlie Feathers ("Trucker's Last Ride"), Rufus Thomas, Big Sam Clarke, Jerry Lee Lewis, Ronnie Milsap, Charlie Rich, Eddie Bond, B.B. King, Cordell Jackson, Ma Rainey and Little Laura Dukes. A Rockabilly Hall Of Fame Inductee and Traditional Country Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Southaven, Mississippi, USA, from complications of an earlier heart attack

Riz Ortolani
(87), jazz composer who worked on more than 200 films, including "Revenge Of The Dead", "The Spy With A Cold Nose", "Castle Of Blood" and "The Yellow Rolls Royce", and the husband of actress and singer Katyna Ranieri. In Rome, Italy, from heart failure.

Lou Reed
(71), singer and songwriter whose hits include "Walk On The Wild Side" and "Vicious" and who was a member of The Jades, The Primitives ("The Ostrich"), The Warlocks, The Velvet Underground ("Sweet Jane" and "What Goes On") and The Metal Machine Trio. He also worked with Metallica ("The View" and "Pumping Blood"). International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Southampton, New York, USA, from complications from a liver transplant

Bobby Parker
(76), singer and songwriter ("Watch Your Step" and "Blues Get Off My Shoulder") and who worked with Otis Williams And The Charms, Bo Diddley, Paul Williams, Sam Cooke, The Everly Brothers, Jackie Wilson, LaVern Baker and Clyde McPhatter. In Lafayette, Louisiana, USA, of heart failure

Bob Day
also known as Bob Allison (72), singer, songwriter and one half of The Allisons who represented the UK at the 1961 Eurovision Song Contest with "Are You Sure". In Trowbridge, Wiltshire, UK, following a long illness

Georges Moustaki
(79), singer-songwriter who wrote "Milord", recorded by Edith Piaf, Bobby Darin and Cher, as well as hits for Cindy Daniel, Yves Montand, Juliette Greco, Pia Colomba, Dalida, Francoise Hardy, Herbert Pagani and France Gall. In Nice, France, from  emphysema

Don Bowman
(76), singer, radio broadcaster ("American Country Countdown"), comedian and songwriter, whose solo country hits include "Chit Atkins, Make Me A Star", but who also penned hits for Jim Stafford ("Wildwood Weed") and Waylon Jennings ("Just To Satisfy You"). In Forsyth, Missouri, USA, of heart failure

Bob Thompson
(88), pianist, composer, arranger and orchestra leader ("On The Rocks" and "Dancing On The Ceiling") who worked with Mae West, Rosemary Clooney, Julie London, Duane Eddy, Judy Garland, Jerry Lewis, Van Dyke Parks, Phil Ochs, Bing Crosby and The Andrews Sisters as well as writing music for films, television and commercials. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure

Bernardo Bonezzi
(48), former member of Los Zombies, and noted movie composer ("Women On The Verge Of A Nervous Breakdown",  "Farmacia De Guardia" and "Todos Los Hombres Sois Iguales"). In Madrid, Spain, of unknown causes

John Carpenter
(68), songwriter and guitarist, whose eight recorded songs all reached Number 1 on SoundClick, including such titles as "Dublin City Waltz", "Tracey & Glen", "Come Dance With Me Caroline" and "Man On The Run". His ninth published track, "Blue Marco", an instrumental, also charted. In Dublin, Ireland, of cancer. All nine published songs can currently be heard at  soundclick.com/songwriterireland

Johnny MacRae
(84), songwriter whose songs have been recorded by Conway Twitty ("I'd Love To Lay You Down"), Reba McEntire ("You Lift Me Up To Heaven") and Doug Stone ("I'd Be Better Off In A Pine Box"). In Ashland City, Tennessee, USA, of heart disease

Brett Walker
(51), singer and songwriter who wrote music for films and TV and also recorded ("Give Me Back Tomorrow" and "No Fire Without You"), working with Jim Peterik, Survivor, Jonathan Cain, Russ Ballard, Alias ("Waiting For love") and Nick Gilder. In Draper, Utah, USA, of cancer

JJ Cale
(74), singer and songwriter ("After Midnight" and "Crazy Mama"), whose songs have been recorded by Eric Clapton, Jai, Kansas, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Tom Petty, Captain Beefheart, Widespread Panic, Randy Crawford, Waylon Jennings, Harry Manx, Carlos Santana, Herbie Mann and Cissy Houston.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In La Jolla, California, USA following a heart attack

Nick Nixon
(74), singer ("Rocking In Rosalee's Boat" and "A Habit I Can't Break"), and songwriter whose songs have been recorded by Barbara Fairchild ("The Teddy Bear Song"), Willie Nelson, Roy Rogers ("Lovenworth"), Barbi Benton, Waylon Jennings and Tanya Tucker. In St Louis, Missouri, USA, of pulmonary lung disease

"Cowboy" Jack Clement
(82), producer, musician and songwriter who worked at Sun Records with Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis and whose songs have been recorded by Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, Dickey Lee, Bobby Bare, Elvis Presley, Jim Reeves, Jerry Lee Lewis, Cliff Richard, Dolly Parton, Carl Perkins, Charley Pride, Hank Snow and Tom Jones. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member, Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee and Country Music Hall Of Fame Inductee

Big Bopper Jr
whose real name was Jay Perry Richardson (54), singer and songwriter and son of J P (The Big Bopper) Richardson. In Katy, Texas, USA, of heart failure

Johnny Smith
(91), guitarist and composer whose tune "Walk, Don't Run" was recorded by Chet Atkins and The Ventures, and who worked with Stan Getz as well as being an NBC studio musician. In Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA, of heart failure

Jackie Lomax
(69), singer, guitarist and songwriter, as well as being a member of Dee And The Dynamites, The Undertakers ("Just A Little Bit"and "Everybody Loves A Lover"), The Lomax Alliance, Heavy Jelly ("Chewn In" and "Time Out") and Badger ("White Lady" and "Don't Pull the Trigger"), who worked with The Tea Bags, George Harrison, Eric Clapton, Gene Clark, Jeff Beck, John Stewart, P.F. Sloan, Lucinda Williams, Leon Russell and Nicky Hopkins. In Wirral, Merseyside, England, of cancer

Larry Wayne Clark
(63), songwriter and ISA International Songwriters Association  contributing editor, amongst whose hundreds of published songs were singles recorded by such country stars as The Statler Brothers and Lee Greenwood. Member of the International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame, and the British Columbia Country Music Hall of Fame. In British Columbia, Canada, from cancer

Lorene Mann
(76), singer and songwriter whose own hits include "Hide My Sin" and "You Love Me Too Little", who worked with Archie Campbell ("Dark End Of The Street" and "Tell It like It Is") and Justin Tubb ("Hurry Mr. Peters" and "We've Gone Too Far Again"), and whose songs have been recorded by Kitty Wells ("Left To Right"), Norma Jean, Rex Allen ("Don't Go Near The Indians"), The Wilburn Brothers, Skeeter Davis ("Something Precious"), Vernon Oxford, Rex Allen, Marvin Rainwater, Walter Brennan, Ben Colder and Jerry Wallace ("My Wife's House"), In Huntland, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

George Jackson
(68), singer and songwriter who wrote, "One Bad Apple" for The Osmonds and "Old Time Rock & Roll" for Bob Seger, and whose songs have been recorded by Otis Clay, Clarence Carter, Wilson Pickett , Z.Z. Hill, Johnnie Taylor, Little Milton and Denise LaSalle. In Ridgeland, Mississippi, USA, of cancer

David Rea
(65), guitarist and songwriter who wrote "Ninety Degrees By Ninety Degrees" and "Pilgrimage to Paradise" and co-wrote Mountain's, "Mississippi Queen", and who worked with Gordon Lightfoot, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Roosevelt Sykes, Tom Rush, Reverend Gary Davis, Richie Havens, Mississippi John Hurt, Ian And Sylvia and Joni Mitchell. In Ontario, Canada, of cancer

Ray Whitley
(69), singer and songwriter who recorded "Deeper In Love"and whose songs have been recorded by The Tams ("Be Young, Be Foolish, Be Happy" and "What Kind Of Fool"), Joe South, Billy Joe Royal ("Everything Turned Blue") and Tommy Roe.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Altlanta, Georgia, USA, of cancer

Alan O'Day
(72), singer and songwriter,and  a member of The Shoves, The Renes, The Archers and Alan & Bob & Denny. His songs have been recorded by Helen Reddy ("Angie Baby"), Cher ("Train Of Thought"), Bobby Sherman ("The Drum") and The Righteous Brothers ("Rock And Roll Heaven"). In Westwood, Los Angeles, California, USA, of brain cancer

George Jones
(81), singer and songwriter, and regarded widely as the greatest country singer of the 20th century.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member, Country Music Hall Of Fame Inductee and Texas Country Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of hypoxic respiratory failure.

Diane Lampert
(88), songwriter ("Nothin' Shakin' (But The Leaves On The Trees)" and "Break It To Me Gently", whose songs have been recorded by Brenda Lee, Jerry Wallace, Judith Durham, Tommy Sands, Steve Lawrence, Earl Grant, Tex Williams, Red Foley and The Lettermen, In New York City, USA, of heart failure

Shadow Morton
(73), songwriter ("Remember Walking In The Sand" and "Leader Of The Pack" for The Shangri-Las), who worked with such acts as Janis Ian ("Society's Child"), Vanilla Fudge ("You Keep Me Hangin' On"), Haystacks Balboa, Iron Butterfly ("In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida"), Jimi Hendrix, The Who, The Blues Project, Mott The Hoople,The New York Rock And Roll Ensemble, The New York Dolls and Isis. In Laguna Beach, California, USA, of heart failure

Sammy Johns
(66), singer, guitarist and songwriter ("Chevy Van", Waylon Jennings' "America",  John Conlee's "Common Man" and Conway Twitty's "Desperado Love"). In  Gastonia, North Carolina, USA, following an accidental electrocution

Tandyn Almer
(70), songwriter (The Association's "Along Comes Mary", the Beachboys' "Sail On Sailor"), and who worked with such acts as Eddie Hodges ("The Paper Fortress", "Butterfly High" and "Sleepy Hollow People"), The Purple Gang, The Garden Club, Pleasure and Brian Wilson.  In McLean, Virginia, USA, from complications of respiratory and cardiac illnesses

Larry Marks
(73), songwriter, producer and singer who sang the Scooby-Doo theme song "Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!", and went on to produce Chad And Jeremy, Gene Clark, The Merry-Go-Round, Liza Minnelli, Helen Reddy, Phil Ochs, The Flying Burrito Brothers and Jimmy Webb, In Los Angeles, California, USA, following a heart attack

Gregory Carroll
(83), singer and songwriter who wrote "Just One Look" which was recorded by Doris Troy, Linda Ronstadt and Anne Murray and worked with The Orioles and Little Esther. In Creston, North Carolina, USA, following an aneurysm

Reg Presley
(71), singer and songwriter ("I Can't Control Myself", "Love Is All Around", "Wild Thing" and "With A Girl Like You"), and lead singer with The Troggs.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Andover, Hampshire, UK, of lung cancer

Eric Lowen
(60), singer and songwriter whose songs were recorded by such acts as Lowen & Navarro ("Learning To Fall" and "Purpose"), Pat Benatar ("We Belong"), David Lee Roth, The Bangles, The Temptations, Dave Edmunds and The Four Tops. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Tommy Wells
(70), guitarist, jingle writer and songwriter who wrote the theme for the TV show "WKRP In Cincinnati". In Atlanta, Georgia, of cancer

Mickey Goldsen
(99), founder of Criterion Music. In Encino, California, USA, of heart failure

Songwriter Obituaries 2012

Dave Brubeck
(92), jazz pianist and composer ("Take Five", "Raggy Waltz", "Unsquare Dance", "Blue Rondo a la Turk") who led the Dave Brubeck Quartet.

International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Norwalk, Connecticut, USA, of heart failure

Frank Wilson
(72), singer, songwriter and producer ("Do I Love You, Indeed I Do"), who wrote for and produced Patrice Holloway, Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, Brenda Holloway, The Four Tops, Eddie Kendricks, The Supremes, Lenny Williams and The Temptations as well as creating the publishers Traco Music and Specolite Music. In Houston, Texas,  USA, of prostate cancer

Gabriel Hardeman
(69), singer, pianist and songwriter (Stephanie Mills' "I Feel Good All Over" and Teddy Pendergrass' "Truly Blessed") who worked with The El Dantes, Patti Labelle, Phil Perry and Phyllis Hyman. In College Park, Georgia, USA, of interstitial fibrosis

B.B. Cunningham
(70), singer, songwriter and pianist, who was a  member of The Hombres ("Let It Out - Let It All Hang Out" and "Am I High - Boy Am I High") and who worked with Ronnie & The Daytonas and Jerry Lee Lewis, as well as being the chief engineer at Independent Recorders where he worked with Billy Joel, Elton John and Lou Rawls. Following a shooting when he came to the aid of a security guard

Frank Dycus
(72), songwriter and guitarist who wrote George Strait's "Unwound" and "Marina Del Rey" and George Jones' "I Don't Need Your Rockin' Chair" and whose songs have been recorded by Mark Chesnutt, George Morgan. Gary Allan and Doug Supernaw. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Lyons, Georgia, USA, of cancer

Juan Carlos Calderon
(77), singer, songwriter and pianist who wrote The Mocedades' "Eres Tu", and whose songs have been recorded by  Luis Miguel, Julio Iglesias, Chayanne, Nino Bravo, Camilo Sesto, Mari Trini, Cecilia, Paloma San Basilio, Rocio Durcal and David Bustamante. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Madrid, Spain, of heart failure

Pecker Dunne
(79), folk singer, songwriter and musician ("Sullivans John"), who worked with Margaret Barry. In Killimer, County Clare, Ireland, of heart failure

Jimmy McCracklin
(91), pianist, singer and songwriter ("Just Got To Know" and "The Walk"), whose songs have been recorded by Otis Redding, Carla Thomas and Salt-n-Pepa. In San Pablo, California, USA, of heart failure

Billy Barnes
(85), songwriter, pianist and actor ("Have I Stayed Too Long At The Fair" and "Something Cool"), whose songs have been recorded by Patti Page, June Christy and Barbra Streisand. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure

Hal David
(91), lyricist whose songs have been recorded by Marty Robbins ("The Story Of My Life"), B. J. Thomas ("Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head"), Dionne Warwick ("Walk On By"), Herb Alpert, ("This Guy's In Love With You"), Sandie Shaw ("There's) Always Something There To Remind Me"), Perry Como ("Magic Moments"), The 5th Dimension ("One Less Bell To Answer"), Tom Jones ("What's New Pussycat?") and many others and who collaborated with Burt Bacharach. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member, Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee and Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame inductee. In Los Angeles, USA, following a stroke

Joe South
(72), singer, songwriter and guitarist ("Games People Play" and "Don't It Make You Want To Go Home"), who worked with Aretha Franklin ("Chain Of Fools"), Tommy Roe ("Sheila"), Bob Dylan, Eddy Arnold and Marty Robbins, and whose songs have been recorded by Elvis Presley, The Osmonds, Deep Purple, Billy Joe Royal ("Down In The Boondocks"), Lynn Anderson ("(I Never Promised You A) Rose Garden"), Bryan Ferry, Coldcut and Gene Vincent. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member, Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee and Georgia Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Buford, Georgia, USA, from heart failure

Marvin Hamlisch
(68), composer and conductor (Lesley Gore's "Sunshine, Lollipops And Rainbows" and "California Nights"), who penned music for the Woody Allen films "Take The Money And Run" and "Bananas", and and also wrote music for the films, "The Sting", "The Spy Who Loved Me", "Ordinary People" and "Sophie's Choice" as well as working with Barbra Streisand, Groucho Marx, Linda Ronstadt and Johnny Mathis. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member and Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of lung failure

Scott McKenzie
(73), songwriter and singer ("San Francisco - Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair", "Like An Old Time Movie" and the Beach Boys' "Kokomo") and who worked with The Singing Strings, The Abstracts, The Smoothies, The Journeymen and a new version of The Mamas And The Papas. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of complications from Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Jimmy Jones
(82), singer and songwriter ("Handy Man" and "Good Timin"), who worked with Jones And Jones, The Berliners, The Sparks Of Rhythm, The Jones Boys and The Savoys. In Birmingham, Alabama, USA, of heart failure

Ralph Ferraro
(83), drummer who composed music for movies ("Flesh Gordon"), and for TV ("The Virginian" and "It Takes A Thief"), and who worked with Nino Rota, Ennio Morricone, Armando Trovaioli, Riz Ortolani, Donny Osmond, Andy Williams and Rod McKuen. In Los Angeles, USA, of respiratory failure

Robin Gibb
(63), singer and songwriter ("Saved By The Bell", "Give Me A Smile", "Stayin' Alive" and "I've Gotta Get A Message To You"), a member of The Bee Gees and an International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In London, UK, of colorectal cancer

Johnny Schott
(66), musician and songwriter ("The Watcher"), who worked with Dime A Dance and The Heywoods. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

Johnny Otis
(91), singer and composer ("Willie And The Hand Jive"), producer (Etta James and Big Mama Thornton). who led the Johnny Otis Show. In Los Angeles, California, of natural causes

Songwriter Obituaries 2011

John Carter
(65), A&R man, songwriter (Strawberry Alarm Clock's "Incense And Peppermints" and The Rainy Daze's "That Acapulco Gold"), producer and manager, who worked with Bob Seger, Steve Miller, Tina Turner, Melissa Etheridge, The Motels, Tonio K, Paula Cole, Bob Welch, Sammy Hagar, Chickenfoot, A&M, Atlantic, Chrysalis, Island and Capitol Records

George Green
(59), songwriter (John Mellencamp's "Hurts So Good" and "Crumblin' Down"), whose songs have been recorded by The Oak Ridge Boys, Barbra Streisand ("Higher Ground"), Hall & Oates, Ricky Skaggs, Sue Medley, Vanessa Williams and Jude Cole. In  Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, of lung cancer

Country Johnny Mathis
(88), singer and songwriter, who was half the duo Jimmy & Johnny ("If You Don't Somebody Else Will" and "Please Talk To My Heart"), whose songs have been recorded by George Jones, Johnny Paycheck, Webb Pierce, Ray Price, Elvis Costello, Wanda Jackson and Tammy Wynette. In Maud, Tennessee, USA, of pneumonia

Taz DiGregorio
(67), musician and member of  The Charlie Daniels Band, who wrote  "The Devil Went Down To Georgia". Near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, following a car accident

Paul Leka
(70), pianist and songwriter (Steam's, "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye" and The Lemon Pipers', "Green Tambourine"). who wrote songs for REO Speedwagon, Jimmie Spheeris, Lori Lieberman, Harry Chapin and Gloria Gaynor. In Sharon, Connecticut, USA, of cancer

Johnny McCauley
(87), singer and songwriter ("Pretty Little Girl From Omagh" and "Destination Donegal"), whose songs have been recorded by Christy Moore and Daniel O'Donnell. In London, UK, of natural causes

Richard Adler
(91), songwriter whose hits include "Rags To Riches" and "Whatever Lola Wants" and whose songs have been recorded by Eddie Fisher, Sarah Vaughan, Patti Page, Doris Day, Rosemary Clooney, Tony Bennett and Archie Bleyer. In Southampton, New York, USA, of natural causes

George Wilberforce Kakoma
(90), songwriter who composed "Oh Uganda, Land Of Beauty" Uganda's national anthem. In Kampala, Uganda, of natural causes

Don Wayne
(79), singer, and songwriter, whose songs have been recorded by Cal Smith ("Country Bumpkin"), Hank Snow, Lefty Frizzell, Burl Ives and George Morgan ("Lonesome Waltz"). A Nashville Songwriter's Hall Of Fame Inductee and an International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer

Robert Sherman
(86), songwriter who co-wrote many songs for Walt Disney Movies, including such hits as "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" and "It's A Small World After All." A Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee. In London, England, of natural causes

Noel Kelehan
(76), pianist, conductor and composer, who conducted of The RTE Concert Orchestra and directed it in 29 Eurovision Song Contests as well as being the musical director for Radio Telefνs Eireann. He also wrote the string arrangements for U2's "The Unforgettable Fire" album. In Dublin, Ireland, of natural causes

Billy Strange
(81), singer, songwriter and guitarist who co-wrote Elvis Presley's "A Little Less Conversation" and Chubby Checker's "Limbo Rock", as well as working with Willie Nelson, The Everly Brothers, The Beach Boys ("Sloop John B"), Nancy Sinatra ("Bang Bang My Baby Shot Me Down"), Nat King Cole, Wanda Jackson, Randy Newman, Jan & Dean, Sammy Davis Jr., Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Duane Eddy. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer

Al DeLory
(82), pianist, producer and arranger who co-wrote Larry Verne's "Mr. Custer" and worked with The Crystals ("He's A Rebel"), The Beach Boys, Tina Turner, The Righteous Brothers, Glen Campbell ("Gentle On My Mind" and "By The Time I Get To Phoenix"), Wayne Newton, Dobie black, The Lettermen and The Turtles. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of cancer

Robert Lockhart
(52), pianist and composer who was musical director for such films as "Cold Comfort Farm", "The Long Day Closes", "Vicious Circles", "Distant Voices" and "Still Lives". In London, England, following a heart attack

Larry Butler
(69), keyboardist, singer, songwriter and producer, who wrote Tammy Wynette's "Only The Strong Survive" and co-wrote B.J. Thomas' "Hey, Won’t You Play Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song" as well as being a member of Jerry Woodward And The Esquires and The Gentry ("Keep On Dancin'" and "Every Day I Have To Cry Some"). Larry worked with The Harry James Orchestra, Red Foley, George Jones, Conway Twitty, Bobby Goldsboro, Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roger Miller, Kenny Rogers ("The Gambler" and "Lucille"), Jean Shepard, Debbie Boone and Mac Davis. An International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Pensacola, Florida, USA, of cancer

Liz Anderson
(81), singer ("Mama Spank" and "The Wife Of The Party"), songwriter, and the mother of country star Lynn Anderson, whose songs have been recorded by Merle Haggard ("My Friends Are Gonna Be Strangers"), Tammy Wynette, Bill Anderson, Skeeter Davis, Charley Pride, Brenda Lee, Waylon Jennings, Loretta Lynn, George Jones, Kitty Wells, Ernest Tubb, Norma Jean, Conway Twitty and Connie Smith. In Roseau, Minnesota, USA, of heart failure

Ruth Roberts
(84), songwriter of such hits as "Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues" and "Meet The Mets", and whose songs have been recorded by Hugo Winterhalter, Arthur Godfrey, The McGuire Sisters, Buddy Holly, Jerry Vale, Jimmy Dean, Steve Allen, Sarah Vaughn, Teresa Brewer and The Beatles. In New York, USA, following a heart attack

Fred Steiner
(88), composer who wrote the theme for "The Rocky And Bullwinkle Show" and "Park Avenue Beat" which was the theme song for TV's "Perry Mason", as well as music for TV's "Lost In Space", "Dynasty", "The Twilight Zone" and "Amazing Stories". In New York, USA, following a stroke

Eddie Burris
(79), drummer and songwriter ("Okie From Muskogee"), who worked with Merle Haggard & The Strangers. In Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA, following a heart attack

Hazel Dickens
(76), singer and songwriter whose songs have been recorded by Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash and Kathy Mattea. In Mercer County, West Virginia, USA, following a stroke

Dolores Fuller
(88), movie actress ("Glen Or Glenda", "Jail Bait"), and songwriter, whose hits include "Rock-a-Hula Baby" and "Someone To Tell It To", and whose songs have been recorded by Nat King Cole, Shelley Fabares, Terry Stafford, Peggy Lee and Elvis Presley. In Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, of heart failure

Lee Pockriss
(87), songwriter whose jots include "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini" and "Leader Of The Laundromat", and whose songs have been recorded by Paul Evans, The Cuff Links, Anita Bryant, Brian Hyland, Perry Como, Shelley Fabares and The Detergents. In Hartford, Connecticut, USA, following a heart attack

Dobie black
(71), singer and songwriter of such hits as "The In Crowd" and "Drift Away", and whose songs have been recorded by Don Williams, Ray Charles, George Jones, Charley Pride and Johnny Mathis. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer

Ralph MacDonald
(67), drummer, and songwriter of such hits as "Just The Two Of Us" and "Where Is The Love", and who worked with Burt Bacharach, David Bowie, Quincy Jones, Carole King, Paul Simon, Aretha Franklin, Steely Dan, The Average White Band, James Taylor, Art Garfunkel, Billy Joel, Amy Winehouse, George Benson, Hall & Oates . In Stamford, Connecticut, USA, of lung cancer

Andrew Gold
(60), singer-songwriter ("Thank You For Being A Friend" and "Lonely Boy"), a member of Bryndle ("Woke Up This Morning") and Wax ("Right Between The Eyes" and "Bridge To Your Heart") who worked with Linda Ronstadt ("You're No Good" and "When Will I Be Loved"), Stephen Bishop, John Lennon, Brian Wilson, James Taylor, Paul McCartney, 10cc, Jackson Browne, Don Henley, Ringo Starr and Art Garfunkel. Son of singer Marni Nixon and composer Ernest Gold. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member

Fred Imus
(69), songwriter of such hits as "I Don't Want To Have To Marry You" (Jim Ed Brown and Helen Cornelius), In Tucson, Arizona, USA, of heart failure

Billy Grammer
(86), songwriter and singer ("Gotta Travel On" and "I Wanna Go Home"). In Benton, Illinois, USA, of natural causes

Betty Thatcher
(67), songwriter whose hits include Renaissance's "Northern Lights" and "Bonjour Swansong", as well as songs for Annie Haslam and Don Airey, In London, UK, of cancer

Jerry Leiber
(78), songwriter and producer who co-wrote, "Hound Dog" and "Stand By Me", and whose songs have been recorded by The Coasters, Big Mama Thornton, The Drifters, Conway Twitty, Joni Mitchell, Count Basie, Dion, Elkie Brooks, The Robins, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, James Brown, The Monkees, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Cheers, Edith Piaf, The Clovers, Stealers Wheel, Johnny Cash, Muddy Waters, The Everly Brothers, John Mellencamp, Ray Charles, John Lennon, Donald Fagen, Ben E. King, Little Richard, Jimi Hendrix, Otis Redding, Peggy Lee, Elvis Presley, Johnny Mathis, Buddy Holly and Bobby Darin. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Los Angeles, USA, of cardiopulmonary failure

Nicholas Ashford
(69), singer and songwriter, one half of the duo Ashford & Simpson ("Solid" and "I'll Find You"), and who wrote songs with his wife Valerie Simpson that were recorded by Ray Charles, The 5th Dimension, Aretha Franklin, Diana Ross,  Teddy Pendergrass,  Chaka Khan, Rufus, Gladys Knight & The Pips, Martha Reeves & The Vandellas, Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In New York, USA, of throat cancer

Jack Hayes
(92), composer and bandleader who rote music for the films, "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" and "The Color Purple", and who worked with Leo Shuken on the films "Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid" and "The Magnificent Seven" as well as  TV's "The Virginian" and "Gunsmoke". In Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA, of heart failure

Gene McDaniels
(76), singer and songwriter whose hits include "A Hundred Pounds Of Clay", "Chip Chip" and "Tower Of Strength", and whose songs have been recorded by Roberta Flack and Eddie Harris. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Maine, USA, of heart failure

Jerry Ragovoy
(81), songwriter and producer who wrote "Time Is On My Side" and "Cry Baby" and whose songs have been recorded by The Rolling Stones, Elvis Costello, Foghat, Janis Joplin, Manfred Mann, Aretha Franklin, Dusty Springfield, Dionne Warwick, B. B. King, Bonnie Raitt, Garnet Mimms And The Enchanters, Barry White, The Drifters, The Move, Bonnie Tyler, The James Gang, Jimi Hendrix, Barbara Acklin, Diana Ross and The Small Faces. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Philadelphia, USA, following a stroke

Amy Winehouse
(27), regarded as the most talented female songwriter of her generation, her album "Back To Black" resulted in six Grammy Award nominations and she won the Ivor Novello Award three times, in 2004 for Best Contemporary Song for "Stronger Than Me", in 2007 for "Rehab", and finally in 2008 for "Love Is a Losing Game". International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In London, UK, of natural causes

Terry Oates
(74), musician and music publisher, who founded Eaton Music in 1975, signing Harry Nilsson, Jimmy Webb and Status Quo . Greatly admired by songwriters for his integrity and kindness. In London, UK, of natural causes

Johnny Preston
(72), singer and songwriter whose hits include "Running Bear" and "Cradle Of Love". In Beaumont, Texas, USA. of heart failure

Hugh Martin
(97), composer and vocal coach who co-wrote, "The Trolley Song" and "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas", and worked with Judy Garland. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Encinitas, California, USA, of heart failure

Joe Morello
(83), drummer and composer, who worked with The Boston Symphony Orchestra, Hank Garland And The Grand Old Opry, Tal Farlow, Stan Kenton, Art Pepper, Howard McGhee, Marian McPartland and The Dave Brubeck Quartet. In Irvington, New Jersey, USA, of heart failure

Big Jack Johnson
(71), singer, guitarist and songwriter, who was a member of Frank Frost And The Night Hawks, Big Jack Johnson And The Oilers and The Jelly Roll Kings ("The Jelly Roll King" and "Catfish Blues"). In Memphis, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

Argentino Luna
(70), singer-songwriter who wrote "Mire Que Lindo Es Mi País Paisano" and "Desde El Recuerdo Te Canto". In Buenos Aires, Argentina, of cancer

Ralph Mooney
(83), steel guitarist and songwriter who co-wrote one of country music's biggest hits "Crazy Arms", and who worked with Buck Owens, Wynn Stewart, Wanda Jackson, Waylon Jennings, Marty Stuart and Merle Haggard. In Kennedale, Texas, USA, of cancer

Johnny Pearson
(86), pianist and composer, who worked with The Rhythm Makers, The Malcolm Mitchell Trio, The Romance In Rhythm Orchestra, The Peter York Concert Orchestra, Sounds Orchestral, The Johnny Pearson Orchestra, Cilla Black and The Top Of The Pops Orchestra, and whose compositions were used as the theme music for such TV shows as  "3-2-1", "All Creatures Great And Small", "Captain Pugwash", "Monday Night Football", "Mary Mungo & Midge" and ITN's "News at Ten". In London, UK, of heart failure

Roberto Pregadio
(82), pianist and composer, who was a member of Sestetto Swing, while co-writing the theme for the film, "The Forgotten Pistolero", as well as composing music for many other films including, "Il Sorriso Della Iena"," Last House On The Beach" and "Quello Sporco Disertore". In Rome, Italy, of cancer

Harley Allen
(55), singer, songwriter and guitarist who worked with The Allen Brothers, and shoe songs have been recorded by Alan Jackson ("Everything I Love"), George Jones ("The Man He Was"), Alison Krauss, Linda Ronstadt, Ricky Skaggs , Garth Brooks and Dierks Bentley, In Brentwood, Tennessee, USA, of cancer

Ronnie Scaife
(63), singer and songwriter who co-wrote "Me And The I.R.S." and "Patsy Come Home" and whose songs have been recorded by Garth Brooks, Ricky Skaggs, Diamond Rio, Conway Twitty, Mel McDaniel and Johnny Paycheck. A cousin of Music Row producer, Joe Scaife, he died in Perry County, Tennessee, USA, following a brain haemorrhage

Charlie Louvin
(84), singer and songwriter ("Ira" and "Great Atomic Power"), who was one of The Louvin Brothers ("Little Reasons" and "Are You Teasing Me"), as well as being an Alabama Music Hall Of Fame Inductee, Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee and Nashville's Country Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Wartrace, Tennessee, USA, of pancreatic cancer

John Barry
(77), composer and conductor, who led The John Barry Orchestra ("Beat For Beatniks" and "Never Let Go"). and wrote music for films including eleven James Bond movies, as well as "Born Free" and "Dances With Wolves". International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Glen Cove, New York USA, following a heart attack

John Strauss
(91), composer and pianist who wrote the theme for TV's "The Phil Silvers Show" and co-wrote the theme for "Car 54, Where Are You?", as well as producing the soundtrack for the film "Amadeus". He was also the music editor for the films "Bananas" and "The Blues Brothers". In West Los Angeles, California, USA, of Parkinson's disease

Todd Cerney
(58), musician and songwriter who co-wrote Steve Holy's, "Good Morning Beautiful" and The Restless Heart's "I'll Still Be Loving You", and who worked with The Nashville Mandolin Ensemble, Thom Shepherd And The Nashville Songwriters Band, The Dixie Chicks, Kenny Rogers and Levon Helm. His songs have been recorded by Etta James, Aretha Franklin, Lynyrd Skynyrd, The Four Tops, Ty Herndon and Cheap Trick. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer

Susan Rotolo
(67), who appeared on the album cover of "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan" and has been credited as the inspiration for Bob Dylan's songs, "Don't Think Twice, It's Alright" and "Boots Of Spanish Leather". She wrote the book "A Freewheelin' Time: A Memoir Of Greenwich Village In The Sixties" and was married to film editor, Enzo Bartoccioli. In Manhattan, New York, USA, of lung cancer

Songwriter Obituaries 2010

Linda Hargrove
(61), singer songwriter ("Love Was Once Around The Dance Floor", "Tennessee Whiskey" and "Just Get Up and Close the Door"), and whose songs have been recorded by George Jones, Leon Russell, Michael Nesmith, Al Green, Tammy Wynette, David Allan Coe, Asleep At The Wheel, Lynn Anderson, Ernest Tubb, Tanya Tucker, Tommy James, and Johnny Rodriguez. In Tallahassee, Florida, USA, from complications from a bone marrow transplant

George David Weiss
(89), songwriter who wrote Elvis Presley's, "Can't Help Falling In Love" and Louis Armstrong's "What A Wonderful World" as well as collaborating on such Broadway musicals as "Mr Wonderful" and "Maggie Flynn", and whose songs have been recorded by Dinah Washington, The Stylistics, Ella Fitzgerald, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Sammy Davis Jr., Perry Como, Nat "King" Cole, Joey Ramone, Patti Page, Sarah Vaughan, Tom Jones, Mel Torme and Kay Starr. A Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Oldwick, New Jersey, USA, of heart failure

Chris Dedrick
(62), singer and songwriter who was a member of Free Design ("Don't Turn Away" and "Kites Are Fun") as well as writing music for such films as "The Saddest Music In The World" and "Childstar". Chris also worked with The Canadian Brass, Barry Mann, Peter, Paul And Mary, The Star-Scape Singers, Melissa Manchester, Simon And Garfunkel and James Taylor. In Toronto, Ontario, Canada, of cancer

Ben Keith
(73), steel guitarist, singer and songwriter who was a member of The Pegi Young Band as well as working with Neil Young, Otis Blanton, Jerry Lee Lewis, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Ann Murray, Ringo Starr, Lonnie Mack, The Band, Linda Ronstadt, Patsy Cline, Ian And Sylvia, Terry Reid, Paul Butterfield, Emmylou Harris, Todd Rundgren, Mother Earth, Warren Zevon, J.J. Cale, David Crosby and Graham Nash. At the Broken Arrow Ranch in California, USA, following a heart attack

Murray Deutch
(90), music industry executive, singer, pianist, and music publisher, who helped with the career of Buddy Holly And The Crickets while head of the music publishing company Peer-Southern International. Later he headed up the music division at United Artists, before founding the publishing company, Buttermilk Sky. Murray was the husband of actress, Lea Thompson, father of film director, Howard Deutch and brother-in-law of actor, Robert Walden. In Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, following a heart attack

Solomon Burke
(70), singer and songwriter of such hits as "Cry To Me" and "Everybody Needs Somebody To Love", who worked with Patty Loveless, Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris, Patty Griffin and Gillian Welch and whose songs have been covered by The Rolling Stones, Wilson Pickett and Otis Redding. Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee, International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Solomon Burke died at Schipol Airport, Amsterdam, Netherlands, following a heart attack

Neil Richardson
(80), composer, arranger and clarinetist, who led The Neil Richardson Singers and worked with Neil Diamond, The BBC Radio Orchestra, Johnny Mathis, Vic Damone and George Shearing. He also wrote for radio, TV and film, and for both The King Singers and The Swingle Singers. In Nerja, Spain, of heart failure.

Dale Hawkins
(74), singer, guitarist and songwriter ("Suzy Q" and "Wildcat Tamer"), who went on the produce The Five Americans ("Western Union"), John Fred & His Playboy Band ("Judy In Disguise"), Jon & Robin, Bruce Channel, The Dolls, Ronnie Self, The Festivals, James Bell, The Gentrys and The Uniques, as well as working with Michael Nesmith and Harry Nillson. In Goldmine, Louisiana, USA, of colon cancer

Nathan Scott
(95), composer, arranger and conductor who wrote music for such TV shows as "Dragnet", "My Three Sons", "Rawhide", "Lassie", "Have Gun Will Travel", "The Twilight Zone", "The Untouchables" and "Wagon Train". In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure

Paul Sharfick
(29), songwriter and member of The Dudes Of Lord. In Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, of gunshot wounds following a bank robbery carried out by Mr. Sharfick

Paul Dunlap
(91), pianist and composer whose compositions for over 200 films and TV shows include scores for the films "Three Stooges In Orbit" and for Abbott And Costello's last movie "Dance With Me, Henry". In Palm Springs, California, of heart failure

Elliot Willensky
(66), songwriter and pianist who wrote "If You Say My Eyes Are Beautiful" and "Got To Be There" and whose songs have been recorded by Chaka Khan, Smokey Robinson, The Fifth Dimension, Gladys Knight, Jermaine Jackson, Whitney Houston, Thelma Houston, Syreeta and Jerry Butler

Eddie Carroll
(77), Canadian actor, comedian and songwriter, who wrote The Lettermen's "How Is Julie". In New York City, USA, of heart failure

Gene Lees
(82), writer, critic and lyricist who collaborated with Antonio Carlos Jobim to write "Quiet Nights Of Quiet Stars" which has been recorded by Diana Krall, Peggy Lee, Queen Latifah, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald. In Ojai, California, USA, following a stroke

Ernie Harwell
(92), songwriter and sportscaster who wrote Homer And Jethro's "Upside Down" and B.J. Thomas's "I Don’t Know Any Better", as well as being a National Sportscasters Hall Of Fame Inductee and Michigan Sports Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Washington, Georgia, USA, of heart failure

Butch White
(71), singer and songwriter who wrote Lee Andrews And The Hearts’ "Teardrops" and worked with The Lee Andrews Group and The Larks. In Philadelphia, USA, following a clot on his lung

Richard Delvy
(68), drummer, songwriter and producer, and a member of The Bel-Airs ("Mr. Moto") and The Challengers who went on to produce The Chambers Brothers and The Outsiders, as well as writing the theme for the film "The Green Slime" and music for the cartoons "The Archies". In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure.

Hank Cochran
(75), singer, guitarist and songwriter ("Sally Was a Good Old Girl" and "I Just Burned A Dream") as well as being half half of the duo The Cochran Brothers (with Eddie Cochran - to whom he was not however related). His songs have been recorded by Patsy Cline ("I Fall To Pieces"), Elvis Costello, George Strait, Burl Ives ("A Little Bitty Tear"), Ray Price ("Make The World Go Away"), Ronnie Milsap, Mickey Gilley, Natalie Cole, Dean Martin, Merle Haggard ("It's Not Love (But It's Not Bad)"), Elvis Presley, Linda Ronstadt and Eddy Arnold ("I Want To Go With You"). A Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee, a Mississippi Music Hall Of Fame Inductee and an International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Hendersonville, Tennessee, USA, of pancreatic cancer

Margaret Ann Rich
(77), songwriter who wrote songs for her husband Charlie Rich ("A Sunday Kind Of Woman" and "Nothing In The World") and whose work has been recorded by Ricky Van Shelton ("Life Has Its Little Ups And Downs"), Tom Jones ("Field Of Yellow Daisies"), Kris Kristofferson ("A Part Of Your Life"), Rita Coolidge and Bobby "Blue" Bland. Founding member of The Memphis chapter of The National Academy Of Recording Arts And Sciences. In Germantown, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

George Richey
(75), songwriter, producer, manager, keyboardist and fiddler who co-wrote Tammy Wynette's "Til I Can Make It On My Own" and "A Picture Of Me (Without You)" and who worked with Ringo Starr, Tommy James, Marty Robbins, Lefty Frizzell and Kenny Rodgers. His songs have been recorded by George Jones, Johnny Cash, Wanda Jackson, Lynn Anderson, Ferlin Husky, Dwight Yoakam, Tanya Tucker, Dottie West and Barbara Mandrell, and he also managed Tammy Wynette to whom he had been married. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Promised Land, Arkansas, USA, of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Bobby Hebb
(72), singer, songwriter, trumpeter and guitarist ("Sunny" and "A Satisfied Mind") as well as working with Bo Diddley ("Diddley Daddy") and Roy Acuff in The Smoky Mountain Boys. His songs have been recorded by Dusty Springfield, The Classics IV, Electric Flag, James Brown, Cher, Lou Rawls ("A Natural Man"), Frank Sinatra, Stevie Wonder, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Del Shannon and Nick Cave. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

Kenny Edwards
(64), guitarist, bassist, singer and songwriter ("The Sky Keeps Falling" and "Gone Again"), and a member of The Stone Poneys ("Different Drum" and "Long Long Time") and Bryndle ("I Want To Touch You" and "Just Can't Walk Away"), and who worked with Stevie Nicks, Don Henley, Warren Zevon, Bonnie Raitt, Rita Coolidge, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Barbi Benton and Emmylou Harris. In Santa Barbara, California, USA, of cancer.

Cor Aaftink
(76), record producer, lyricist and co-founder of the production company Corduroy who produced BZN. In Amsterdam, Netherlands, following a heart attack

Tony Clarke
(69), guitarist and songwriter (Malcolm Roberts' "Our Song"), and a session musician for Decca Records who produced The Moody Blues, The Equals, Providence, Clannad, Pinkerton's Colours, Rick Wakeman, Nicky Hopkins and The Four Tops. In London, UK, of heart failure

Neil Christian
(67), singer and songwriter ("That's Nice" and "Two At A Time"), who led Neil Christian And The Crusaders, managed Crushed Butler and worked with Jimmy Page and Richie Blackmore. In London, UK

Willie Mitchell
(82), songwriter, trumpeter, producer and arranger ("30-60-90", "Soul Serenade" and "20-75") who worked with and produced Al Green, O. V. Wright, Otis Clay, Bobby Blue Bland, Ann Peebles, Syl Johnson, Jimmy McCracklin, Betty Everett, Pops Staples, 5 Royales, Little Jimmy King, Preston Shannon, Ike Turner, John Mayer and Buddy Guy and worked for Waylo, The Home Of The Blues, and Hi Records. In Memphis, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

Bobby Charles
who wrote under the name Robert Charles Guidry (72), singer and songwriter who penned Fats Domino's "Walking To New Orleans" and Bill Haley And The Comets' "See You Later Alligator", worked with Dr. John, The Band and Clarence "Frogman" Henry and whose songs have been recorded Kris Kristofferson, Ray Charles, Delbert McClinton, Etta James and Gatemouth Brown. A Louisiana Music Hall of Fame Inductee and an International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member, he died in Abbeville, Louisiana, USA, following a heart attack

Chilton Searcy Price
(96), songwriter, whose hits include "Slow Poke" and "You Belong To Me" and whose songs have been recorded by Doris Day, Tony Bennett, Bob Dylan, Joni James, The Duprees, Johnny Mathis, Paul Anka, Tori Amos, Pee Wee King, Redd Stewart, Jo Stafford, Dean Martinand Ella Fitzgerald. In Louisville, Kentucky, USA, of natural causes

Alistair Hulett
(59), singer, guitarist and songwriter ("Everyone I Know" and "Almost Unintentional"), who was a member of Roaring Jack ("Yuppietown" and "The Lass Behind The Beertaps") and who worked with Dave Swarbrick ("Don't Sign Up For War" and "The Granite Cage"). In Glasgow, Scotland, of liver failure

Johnny Dankworth
(83), saxophonist. clarinettist and composer, who led The Dankworth Seven, worked with Charlie Parker, Clark Terry, Lionel Hampton, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Benny Goodman, Herbie Hancock, Dudley Moore and Sidney Bechet, and penned music for TVs, "The Avengers" and "Tomorrow's World", and was married to singer, Cleo Laine. In Woodford, Essex, UK

Songwriter Obituaries 2009

Vic Chesnutt
(45), singer, songwriter and guitarist ("Isadora Duncan" and "Flirted With You All My Life"), and a member of Brute ("All Kinds" and "Let's Get Down To Business"), The La-Dee-Das, The Amorphous Strums, and who also worked with Elf Power, Lambchop, Widespread Panic, Van Dyke Parks, Michael Stipe, Victoria Williams, Bill Frisell, Thee Silver Mt. Zion, Godspeed You, Black Emperor, Guy Piccioto, The Cowboy Junkies and Liz Durrett, as well as appearing in the film "Sling Blade". International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Athens, Georgia, by suicide

Eric Woolfson
(64), singer, songwriter and pianist who co-founded The Alan Parsons Project ("Time" and "Eye In The Sky") and collaborated with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, and whose songs have been recorded by Peter Noone, Marianne Faithfull, Frank Ifield, Dave Berry, Joe Dassin, Marmalade and The Tremeloes. In London, UK, of cancer

Teddy Vann
(75), songwriter and producer who co-wrote Johnny Thunder's "Loop De Loop" and Luther Vandross' "The Power Of Love /Love Power") and who worked with Roberta Meshel, Lou Donaldson. John Fogerty and Donna Summers. In New York City, USA, of cancer

Cliff Crofford
(80), songwriter, singer, trumpet player and guitarist who worked with The Orange Blossom Playboys, The Jimmy Thomason Band, Billy Mize ("Tell Him No") and The Beardsley Ball Room as well as appearing in the films "Every Which Way But Loose" and "Smokey And The Bandit II". In Rochester, Texas, USA, following a stroke

Norton Buffalo
(58), singer, songwriter and harmonica player ("The Odds Are Against Us" and "Ain't No Bread In The Breadbox"), and who was also a member of High Noon, The Knockouts, Norton & Friends and The Stampede as well as working with Clover, The Moonlighters, Elvin Bishop, The Steve Miller Band ("Winter Time" and "The Stake"), Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen, The Doobie Brothers, Bonnie Raitt, Johnny Cash, Judy Collins, Amy Grant, George Kahumoku Jr. and Ramblin' Jack Elliott. In Paradise, California, USA, following a heart attack

Luther Dixon
(77), singer, songwriter, producer and guitarist who co-wrote Top Ten hits for Gene McDaniels ("A Hundred Pounds Of Clay"), The Crests' ("Sixteen Candles") and The Shirelles' ("Tonight's The Night") as well as working with The Four Buddies, The Barons and The Buddies For Glory. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Jacksonville, Florida, USA, following a heart attack

Johnny Mullins
(86), songwriter and guitarist who wrote Emmy Lou Harris' "Blue Kentucky Girl", Porter Wagoner's "Company's Comin" and Loretta Lynn's "Success") and was a Missouri Writers Hall of Fame Inductee. In Springfield, Missouri, USA of Alzheimers disease.

Patrick Swayze
(57), actor, songwriter and singer, whose hits include "She's Like The Wind". In Los Angeles, California, USA, of cancer

Johnny Mullins
(86), songwriter and guitarist whose songs include Emmy Lou Harris's "Blue Kentucky Girl", Porter Wagoner's "Company's Comin" and Loretta Lynn's "Success". In Springfield, Missouri, USA, of alzheimer's disease

Freddy Bienstock
(81), music publisher, CEO of Carlin America music publishing and co-founder of The Hudson Bay Music Company. At Carlin, he built an expansive catalogue of more than 100,000 of America's best-loved hits, including classics like "Fever", "Happy Together", "The Twist" and "What a Wonderful World".  He began his storied career in the stock room of publisher Chappell and Company, later becoming its Chairman. He served on the NMPA Board from 1989 until 2008. He also served on the board of ASCAP. In Zurich, Switzerland, of heart failure

Ellie Greenwich
(69), singer, pianist, songwriter and producer, whose songs include "Then He Kissed Me", "Leader Of The Pack", "Hanky Panky" and "Da Doo Ron Ron". She was also a member of The Jivettes and The Raindrops ("What A Guy" and "That Boy John") and worked with Frank Sinatra, Dusty Springfield, Bobby Darin, Lesley Gore, Desmond Child, Paul Shaffer, Neil Diamond, Ella Fitzgerald, Nona Hendryx, Cyndi Lauper and Lou Christie. Formerly married to songwriter Jeff Barry. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In New York, USA, following a heart attack

Walter Haynes
(81), steel guitarist and producer  who co-wrote, "Girl On The Billboard" and worked with Jimmy Dickens ("We Could"), Del Reeves, Ferlin Husky, Webb Pierce, The Everly Brothers, J.J. Cale, Jeanne Pruett and Patsy Cline ("Walkin' After Midnight"), as well as producing Marty Robbins and Bill Monroe and being a staff musician on The Grand Ole Opry. In Tyler, Texas, USA

Waldi Schubert
(72), member of the Advisory Council of the International Songwriters Association. On July 14th 2009, in London, UK, following a short illness. Deeply regretted by his brothers George and Arthur, his niece Bridget, his family, the chairman, staff and members of the International Songwriters Association, and a wide circle of friends

Angela Morley
(known also by her male name Wally Stott) (84), English-born composer, conductor and saxophonist, who wrote music for "Dynasty", "Dallas" and "Wonder Woman" as well as playing with the Bert Clegg Band, the Oscar Rabin Band and The Geraldo Orchestra. Stott also did arrangements for Benny Goodman and Nelson Riddle and worked with Rosemary Clooney, Mel Torme, Shirley Bassey and Dusty Springfield as well as collaborating with John Williams. In  Scottsdale, Arizona, USA of complications from a fall

Clive Scott
(64), keyboardist, singer, songwriter and a  member of Scott And The Antarctics and Jigsaw ("Sky High" and "Who Do You Think You Are?"). In Coventry, Warwickshire, UK, following a stroke suffered during brain surgery

Kenny Rankin
(69),  singer, songwriter and guitarist ("In The Name Of Love" and "Peaceful"), who worked with Bob Dylan ("Subterranean Homesick Blues" and "Maggie's Farm") and whose songs have been recorded by Peggy Lee, Stephen Bishop, Carmen McRae, Helen Reddy and Mel Torme. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of cancer

Bob Bogle
(75), guitarist, bassist, and composer, who was a member of The Versatones, The Impacts and The Ventures (Walk Don't Run" and "Hawaii Five-O"), becoming a Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Vancouver, Washington, USA of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Steve Race
(88), pianist, broadcaster and composer ("Nicola" and "Faraway Music"), who worked with Harry Leader, The RAF Swing Stars, Lew Stone and Cyril Stapleton, and who was an arranger for the Ted Heath Band and Judy Garland as well as hosting radio's and TV's "My Music".  In London, UK, of heart failure

Hugh Hopper
(64), bassist and composer ("Hopper Tunity Box" and "Gnat Prong"), who  was a member of The Wilde Flowers, Soft Machine, Soft Works,  and Humi and who worked with Syd Barrett ("No Good Trying" and "Love You"), East Wind, Gilgamesh, Equipe Out, Caveman Shoestore, Isotope, In Cahoots, Short Wave, Lisa S. Klossner, Clear Frame, and The Carla Bley Band. In London, UK, of leukaemia

Ernie Ashworth
(81), singer and songwriter ("Each Moment Spent With You" and "Talk Back Trembling Lips"), whose songs have been recorded by Little Jimmy
Dickens, Paul Anka, Carl Smith and Johnny Horton. An Alabama Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Huntsville, Alabama, USA, of heart failure

Hank Locklin
(91), singer and songwriter ("Please Help Me I'm Falling" and "Send Me The Pillow That You Dream On"). A member of The Rocky Mountain Playboys,  he worked with The Oak Ridge Boys and The Jordanaires. His songs have been recorded by Willie Nelson, Gene Autry, Dwight Yoakam, Charley Pride, Dolly Parton and Roy Rogers. Florida Artists Hall Of Fame Inductee, and regarded as the singer who most influenced the growth of country music in Ireland. In Brewton, Alabama, USA, of heart failure

Arthur Kent
(89), songwriter and pianist (Skeeter Davis's "The End Of The World" and Julie London's "I'm Coming Back To You"), who collaborated with Johnny Mercer, Sammy Gallop and Redd Evans and whose songs have been recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Eydie Gorme, Steve Lawrence and The Mills Brothers. In Florence, South Carolina, USA, of cancer

Cornelia Wallace
(70), singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist ("It's No Summer Love" and "Baby With The Barefoot Feet"), who worked with Roy Acuff and was both the niece of Governor James Folsom and the second wife of American presidential candidate Governor George Wallace of Alabama. In Sebring, Florida, USA, of cancer

Scott Turner
(77), singer and songwriter (Gene Vincent's "If You Want My Lovin'" and Tennessee Ernie Ford's "Hicktown"), and former member of Tommy Sands And The Raiders who worked with Guy Mitchell and Eddie Fisher, collaborated with Buddy Holly, Audie Murphy, Doc Pomus, Alex Harvey, Herb Alpert and John Marascalco as well as producing Slim Whitman, Del Reeves and Jimmy Clanton. In Cobleskill, New York, USA, following a heart attack

Steve Dullaghan
(43), guitarist songwriter, and a member of The Primitives ("Crash" and "Really Stupid"). In Cheylesmore, near Coventry, UK, of undisclosed causes

Michael Sucher
(49), keyboardist, guitarist, bassist, singer and songwriter ("Twilight Morning" and "Liquid Sun"), as well as being a member of Theory In Practice, The Sandra Wright Band and Rush Hour. He also worked with Big Joe Burrell, Mighty Sam McClain, Danny Gatton, Tom Principato, and Tim Eyermann's East Coast Offering. In Montpelier, Vermont, USA, of lung cancer

Tristram Cary
(83), composer who wrote the music for many films  including "Quatermass And The Pit" and "The Ladykillers", as well as television's  "Doctor Who". In Oxford, UK of heart failure

Lou Teicher
(84), composer and one half of the piano duo Ferrante & Teicher ("Theme From Exodus", "Theme From The Apartment" and "Midnight Cowboy"). In Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, USA, of heart failure

Mel Galley
(60), guitarist, songwriter, and member of Whitesnake ("Here I Go Again" and "Love Ain't No Stranger"), Trapeze ("It's Only A Dream" and "Another Day"), Phenomena and Finders Keepers ("Sadie, The Cleaning Lady") as well as working with Cozy Powell ("Formula One"). In Cannock, Staffordshire, UK, of cancer of the oesophagus

Robert Hazard
(60), country singer-singwriter who also wrote Cyndi Lauper's, "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun" as well as leading Robert Hazard And The Heroes ("Escalator Of Life" and "Change Reaction"). In Boston, Massachusetts, USA, after surgery for pancreatic cancer

Stephen Garrett
aka Static, (32), singer, songwriter and producer who co-wrote Aaliyah's "Are You That Somebody" as well as songs for Nicole Wray, Brandy and Destiny's Child, while a member of Playa. In Louisville, Kentucky, USA, following a brain aneurysm

Artie Singer
(90), bass player, bandleader, songwriter, and label owner (Singular Records), who produced Danny & The Juniors' "At The Hop" and "Rock 'N' Roll Is Here To Stay" and made frequent appearences on TV's The Paul Whiteman Show as well as being a vocal coach for Chubby Checker, Al Martino, Frankie Avalon and Bobby Rydell. In King Of Prussia, Pennsylvania, USA, of heart failure

Leonard Rosenman
(84), composer who wrote music for such films as "Rebel Without A Cause", "Fantastic Voyage" and "Beneath The Planet Of The Apes" and for TV's "Marcus Welby MD" and "Combat!".  In Woodland Hills, California, USA following a heart attack

Gloria Shayne Regney Baker
(70), wife of composer Noel Regney, and a songwriter in her own right, who penned such hits as Johnny Mathis' "Do You Hear What I Hear" and James Darren's "Goodbye Cruel World". In Stamford, Connecticutt, USA, of heart failure

John Martyn
(61), English singer-songwriter ("London Conversation" and "Fly On Home"), who worked with Eric Clapton, Danny Thompson, David Gilmour, Elton John and Phil Collins. In Thomastown, Kilkenny, Ireland, of pneumonia

Songwriter Obituaries 2008

Maurice Jarre
(85), French composer who penned more than 150 film scores including "Ghost", "Doctor Zhivago", "Enemy Mine", "Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome" and "Lawrence Of Arabia". In Los Angeles, California, USA, of cancer

Michael Cox
(61), singer, songwriter and novelist ("In The Old Days" and "Am I?" as Matthew Ellis) and the book, "The Meaning Of Night". In Northamptonshire, UK, of cancer

Donald Kahn
(90), son of composer Gus Kahn, and a songwriter who wrote such songs as "A Beautiful Friendship", and tunes recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Margaret Whiting, Kenny G., Bobby Troup, Jack Jones, Shirley Horn, Sarah Vaughan and Rosemary Clooney. In New York, USA, of heart failure

Norman Whitfield
(66), songwriter, pianist and producer, who worked with Motown, collaborated with Barrett Strong, and whose hits include songs recorded by The Temptations ("(I Know) I'm Losing You"), Marvin Gaye ("Pride & Joy"), Gladys Knight & The Pips ("I Heard It Through The  Grapevine"), Edwin Starr ("War"), Rare Earth, Rose Royce ("Car Wash") and The Undisputed Truth ("Smiling Faces Sometimes"). International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Detroit, Michigan, USA, of diabetes and other illnesses

Nappy Brown
(79), singer, songwriter and musician ("Don't Be Angry" and "Night Time Is The Right Time"), and who worked with The  Heavenly Lights as well as recording for Savoy, Alligator, Bling Pig, Stockholm,  Black Top, JSP, Meltone, Ichiban, and New Moon Records. In Charlotte, North Carolina, USA, of heart failure

Jerry Reed
(72), singer, songwriter, guitarist and actor ("When You're Hot, You're Hot" and "Guitar Man") and who worked with Chet Atkins, Bobby Bare, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson and Elvis Presley, and whose songs have been recorded by Brenda Lee, Gene Vincent and Porter Wagoner. As an actor, he appeared in all three, "Smokey And The Bandit" movies. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of complications from emphysema

Charles "Ray" Loring
(65), composer and pianist who wrote the score for the film, "Ruby" as well as over 100 episodes of NOVA's "Saving The National Treasures" series. In Bethlehem, New Hampshire, USA, following a heart attack suffered while hiking

Rick Wright
(64), keyboardist, singer and songwriter - ("Mad Yannis Dance" and "Against The Odds") as well as being a member of The Pink Floyd Sound which became Pink Floyd ("The Great Gig In The Sky" and "Astronomy Domine") and Zee. A Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee, he died in London, UK, from cancer

Isaac Hayes
(66), songwriter, producer, arranger and actor who-wrote Sam & Dave's, "Soul Man" and penned "Theme From Shaft", "I Can't Turn Around" and "Joy", as well as working with Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, Sammy Davis Jr., Albert King and Alcia Keys and being the voice of the cartoon character Chef on TV's "South Park". A Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee and Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Memphis, Tennessee, USA, following a stroke

Ronnie Drew
(73), folk singer, songwriter and guitarist, who founded The Ronnie Drew Group which became The Dubliners ("Seven Drunken Nights" and a version of "Finnegan's Wake"), as well as working with The Pogues, Eleanor Shanley, Christy Moore, Antonio Breschi and The Dropkick Murphys. In Dublin, Ireland, of heart failure

Robert L'Herbier
(87), singer/songwriter and a Canadian Association Of Broadcasters Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Quebec, Canada, from heart failure

Clyde Otis
(84), songwriter and producer who worked with Brook Benton ("It's Just A Matter Of Time" and  "Endlessly"), Sarah Vaughan, Charlie Rich, Sonny James,  Timi Yuro and The Diamonds. In Englewood, New Jersey, USA, of heart failure

Daniel Hetu
(58), pianist and songwriter ("J'Attendais") and musical director for Rene Simard. In Montreal, Canada, of cirrhosis of the liver

Fr. Eddie Hontiveros
also known as Fr. Honti (85), composer and musician who wrote such hymns as "Papuri Sa Diyos" and "Magnificat". In Iloilo City, Philippines, of heart failure

Frank Lewin
(83), composer who penned music for such TV shows as "The Nurses" and "The Defenders". In Breslau, Germany, of congestive heart failure

Cliff Thomas
(67), singer and guitarist who led the Cliff Thomas Trio, co-writing such hits as "Lovers Holiday" and "Pickin' Wild Mountain Berries", In Gulfport, Mississippi, USA, of cancer

Jeff Salen
(55), guitarist, singer and songwriter and a member of The Tuff Darts ("Who's Been Sleeping Here?" and "All For The Love of Rock and Roll"), and who led Tuff Jeff Salen & The Silencers, working with Robert Gordon, Chris Spedding and Ian Hunter. In New York, following a heart attack

Charlie Ryan
(93), musician and songwriter ("Hot Rod Lincoln"), who led Charlie Ryan And The Livingston Brothers and Charlie Ryan And The Timberline Riders Minnesota Rock & Country Hall Of Fame Inductee and a Rockabilly Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Spokane, Washington, USA, of heart failure

Teo Macero
(73), producer, composer and saxophonist who worked with Charles Mingus, Teddy Charles, Robert Palmer, The Lounge Lizards, Vernon Reid, D.J. Logic, The Sandole Brothers, Third Stream and Miles Davis and also at Columbia Records with Dave Brubeck, J. J. Johnson, Mahalia Jackson, Johnny Mathis and Thelonious Monk. In Riverhead, New York, USA, following a long illness.

Robert C (Bob) Bull
(62), lyricist and one half (with melody writer John King) of The Two Old Crocks, whose CD received airplay worldwide, and raised money for the Motability Charity. In Cardiff, Wales, following a long illness

Rod Allen
(63), singer, songwriter, bassist, and a member of The Cliftones who became The Fortunes ("You've Got Your Troubles", "Caroline",  "Here It Comes Again", "Freedom Come, Freedom Go", "Storm In A Teacup" and "Here Comes That Rainy Day Feeling"). In Coventry, UK, of liver cancer

Mort Garson
(84), composer, arranger and accompanist who co-wrote Ruby And The Romantics' "Our Day Will Come" and worked with Mel Torme, The Lettermen, The Sandpipers, The Sugar Shoppe, The Hollyridge Strings, The Sunset Strings, Doris Day, Glenn Yarborough and Glen Campbell. In San Francisco, UK, of renal failure

Cy Leslie
(86), founder of Pickwick  Records and a Vice Chairman of The Songwriters Hall Of  Fame. In Roslyn, New York, of heart failure

John Stewart
(69), singer and songwriter (The Monkees "Daydream Believer") who led Johnny Stewart And The Furies ("Rockin' Anna") as well as working with The Woodsmen, The Cumberland Three and The Kingston Trio. In San Diego, California, USA, of heart failure

Mike Smith
(65), singer, keyboardist, songwriter and producer, who led Mike Smith's Rock Engine, and was a member of The Dave Clark Five ("Glad All Over" and "Catch Us If You Can") as well as being a Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. In London, UK, of pneumonia

Norman Smith
better known as Hurricane Smith (85), musician, producer and songwriter, who was the engineer for all of The Beatles recordings until 1965, before going on to produce Pink Floyd and The Pretty Things. In the 1970s, at the age of 50, he set out to become a recording star in his own right, and scored Top 10 hits including "Don't Let It Die" and "Oh Babe What Would You Say?" In London, UK, of heart failure

Bobby Lee Trammell
(68), singer, guitarist and songwriter (he did, "Arkansas Twist" and "You Mostest Girl") and a member of the Arkansas House of Representatives. In Jonesboro, Arkansas, USA. Following a heart attack.

Songwriter Obituaries 2007

Lew Spence
(88), songwriter who penned such hits as "So Long My Love" and "Nice 'n Easy" and whose songs have been recorded by Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Bobby Short, Peggy Lee, Nat King Cole, Johnny Mathis, Bing Crosby, Billy Eckstine and Dinah Shore. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of heart failure.

Lee Hazlewood
(78), singer, songwriter and producer ("Trouble Is A Lonesome Town" and "Six Feet Of Chain"), whose songs have been recorded by Sanford Clark ("The Fool"), Nancy Sinatra ("These Boots Are Made For Walking"), Duane Eddy, Dean Martin ("Houston"), Primal Scream, Nick Cave, Harry Nilsson, The Astronauts and Megadeth. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Henderson, Nevada, USA, of renal cancer

Sheriff Tex Davis
(93), songwriter, manager and promoter who co-wrote Gene Vincent's "Be-Bop-A-Lula" and worked at Monument Records promoting Dolly Parton, Kris Kristofferson and Jeannie Seely.  In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

Ronnie Hazlehurst
(79), composer and musician who wrote music for such classic TV shows as "Are You Being Served?", "Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em", and "Three Up, Two Down". In St Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands, following a heart bypass

Porter Wagoner
(80), singer, guitarist and songwriter who wrote or co-wrote, "Green Green Grass Of Home", "Carroll County Accident" and "Skid Row Joe", as well as working with Dolly Parton and hosting "The Porter Wagoner Show". Member of the Grand Ole Opry and the Country Music Hall Of Fame. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of lung cancer

Ralph Kessler
(88), composer, trumpeter and music arranger for TVs "Arthur Godfrey & Friends" as well as writing music for "Murder She Wrote", "Quincy", "Hawaii Five-O", "Streets Of San Francisco" and "Barnaby Jones . In the Bronx, New York City, USA, of heart failure

Tom Dawes
(64), singer, songwriter and a member of The Rhondells which became The Cyrkle ("Red Rubber Ball" and "Turn-Down Day"), who also  wrote advertising jingles. In New York, USA, following a stroke after carotid artery surgery

Hy Zaret
(100), lyricist who co-wrote the classic "Unchained Melody", and whose songs have been recorded by Jimmy Dorsey, Lena Horne, The Andrews Sisters, Vaughn Monroe, Guy Lombardo, The Righteous Brothers, They Might Be Giants, U2 and Elvis Presley. In Westport, Connecticut, USA, of heart failure

Glenn Sutton
(70), songwriter and producer who co-wrote "Almost Persuaded" and "I Don't Wanna Play House", and worked with Billy Sherrill. Former husband of singer, Lynn Anderson. Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, following a heart attack

Carson Whitsett
(62), songwriter who worked with The Imperial Show Band, Eric  Mercury, Paul Simon, Z.Z. Hill, Bobby "Blue" Bland, Kathy Mattea and a new line-up of The MGs ("Sugar Cane"), and who wrote and co-wrote  songs for Etta James, Johnnie Taylor, Irma Thomas, Joe Louis Walker,  Johnny Adams, Lorrie Morgan and John Anderson. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of brain cancer

Ben Weisman
(86), affectionately nicknamed by Elvis Presley as "The Mad Professor", who wrote and co-wrote music for Barbra Streisand ("Love In The Afternoon"), Johnny Mathis ("When I Am with You"), Bobby Vee, The Beatles and Elvis Presley ("Follow That Dream" and "Fame And Fortune"). International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of complications from Alzheimer's disease and stroke

Freddie Scott
(74), singer  and songwriter ("Hey, Girl", "Are You Lonely For Me Baby" and "What Do I See In The Girl") as well as being a member of Sally Jones & The  Gospel Keyes and The Swanee Quintet Juniors ("Far Away  Places"). In Jamacia, Queens, New York, of heart failure

Will Schaefer
(79), who composed or conducted music for TV's "The Wonderful World Of Disney", "I Dream Of Jeannie", "Hogan's Heroes", "The Flying Nun", "The Phil Silvers Show" and "Buck Rogers In The 25th Century" as well as being an arranger for Buddy Rich and Count Basie. In Palm Desert, California, USA, of cancer

Hank Medress
(69), singer, songwriterm producer and member of the The Tokens ("The Lion Sleeps Tonight" and "Tonight I Fell In  Love"), before going on to  produce The Happenings, Melissa Manchester, Frankie Valli, The Chiffons ("He's So Fine"), Dawn ("Candida" and "Knock Three  Times") , Tony Orlando And Dawn ("Tie A Yellow Ribbon (On The Old Oak  Tree)") and Buster Poindexter ("Hot Hot Hot"). A Vocal Group Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Manhattan, New York, USA, of lung cancer

Scott Mateer
(46), songwriter, DJ and producer whi co-wrote Lorrie Morgan's, "Dear Me". In Flowood, Mississippi, USA, of heart failure

Carlos Alberto Ferreira Braga
(99), songwriter and singer whose songs include "Copacabana" and "Yes, Nos Temos Bananas". In Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, of heart failure

Del Reeves
(75), country singer and songwriter who scored with such songs as "The Girl On The Billboard" and "Looking At The World Through A Windshield") and who Worked with Jim Lauderdale ("Diesel, Diesel, Diesel"), Bobby Goldsboro and Penny DeHaven. In Centerville, Indiana, USA, of emphysema

Jerry Hayes
(61), guitarist, drummer, singer and songwriter who led Jerry Hayes And The Wabash Cannon Band and wrote "Who's Cheatin' Who" and Charlie Rich's "Rollin' With The Flow". In Memphis, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

Jimmy Campbell
(63), singer, guitarist and songwriter whose songs include "When I Cross Your Path". He was a member of The Panthers, The Kirkbys ("It's A Crime" and "Don't You Want Me No More"), 23rd Turnoff ("Michaelangelo") and Rockin' Horse, and his songs have been recorded by Billy Fury ("That's Right That's Me"), The Swinging Blue Jeans ("Keep Me Warm Til The Sun Shines") and The Merseys ("Penny In My Pocket"). In Liverpool, UK, of heart failure

Ray Evans
(92), songwriter who wrote such classics as "Que Sera Sera", "Mona Lisa",  "Buttons and Bows", "Tammy" and "Silver Bells".  along with the themes for TV's "Bonanza" and "Mr. Ed")  as well as collaborating with Jay Livingston, Henry Mancini, Max Steiner, and Victor Young. In Los Angeles, USA, of heart failure

Dickie Thompson
(90), guitarist and songwriter whose first song, "Thirteen Women And One Man" was  covered by Bill Haley And The Comets. Thomson recorded for  Signature, Regal, Herald and Decca Records and worked  for Jackie Wilson and Don Ho. In Tucson, Arizona, USA, following a stroke

Laura Brooke
(14), singer-songwriter whose first album "Right Place, Wrong Time" was due to be released this week. In Charlotte County. Florida, USA, following a motoring accident

Songwriter Obituaries 2006

Johnny Average
(born Mick Hodgkinson), (61), British singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist who led Johnny Average And The Falcons and The Johnny Average Band ("Ch Ch Cherie" and "Gotta Go Home") and who worked or wrote with Ian Kimmet, Mick Ronson, Meatloaf, Brian Briggs, Billy J. Kramer, Jerry Dorsey, Terry Dactyl And The Dinosaurs and Brett Marvin & The Thunderbolts. In Kingston, New York, USA, of cancer

Marijohn Wilkin
(86), the "Den Mother of Music Row", singer and songwriter of such classics as "The Long Black Veil" and "One Day At A Time". She led The Marijohn Singers. and worked with Red Foley, The Jordanaires and the Anita Kerr Singers. Her songs have been recorded by Johnny Cash, The Beatles, Jimmy Dean, Patsy Cline, Mitchell Torok, Johnny Horton, Wanda Jackson, Marilyn Sellars, Stonewall Jackson, Joan Baez, The Band, Webb Pierce, Eddie Cochran, Brenda Lee, Mel Tillis, Cowboy Copas, The Kingston Trio, Burl Ives, Eddie Cochran and Rod Stewart. She was the mother of guitarist Buck "Ronny" Wilkins. Nashville Songwriters Hall Of Fame Inductee. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Kemp, Texas, USA, following a long illness

Patricia Muller
(54), singer, songwriter and musician, whose songs include "Captured By The Net". In Dinnington, Sheffield, UK, of cancer

Betty Comden
(89), lyricist of such hits as "New York, New York" and "The Party's Over", and who collaborated with Adolph Green, Leonard Bernstein, Cy Coleman, Jule Styne and Andre Previn. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In New York, USA of heart failure

Malcolm Arnold
(84), composer of music for 132 films, including "The Bridge On The River Kwai" and "Hobson's Choice". International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In London, UK, of heart failure

Buddy Killen
(73), publisher, songwriter, producer and session musician  who wrote, The Little Dippers' "Forever" and Conway Twitty's "I May Never Get To Heaven" as well as helping launch the careers of Dolly Parton and Bill Anderson while producing Jerry Lee Lewis, Joe Tex, George Jones, Dottie West, Carol Channing and Fats Domino. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of liver and pancreatic cancer

Paul Mauriat
(81), orchestra leader and songwriter of such hits as "Love Is Blue" and "I Will Follow Him" as well as many songs for Mireille Mathieu, Charles Aznavour, Melina Mercouri, Leo Ferre and Leny Escudero. In Perpignan, France, of heart failure

Jack Palance
(87), actor, singer and songwriter whose songs include "The Meanest Guy That Ever Lived" and "Love Can Only Mean You". He also appeared in the films "The City Slickers", "Shane" and "Sudden Fear" and hosted TV's "Ripley's Believe It Or Not". In Hazle Township, Pennsylvania, USA, of heart failure

Steve Benbow
(75), guitarist, singer and music director who led The Steve Benbow Folk Four, working with Dave Kier's Jazz Band, The Benbow Crew, The Chas McDevitt Skiffle Group, The Brady Boys, Spike Milligan, The Strawberry Hill Boys and The Sonny Stewart Skiffle Kings. In London, UK. of heart failure

John W. Peterson
(85), songwriter of more than one thousand songs, including "It Took A Miracle" and "Over The Sunset Mountains" as well as being president of Singspiration, a sacred music publishing company, and co-founder of Good Life Productions and The John W. Peterson Music Company. In Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, of cancer

Stanley Cherry
(74), television writer, director, and producer who also wrote music for many of his television projects, such as "The Dick Van Dyke Show", "Flipper", "Gilligan's Island" and "Peyton Place". In Studio City, California, USA, of cancer

Patrice Holloway
(58), sister of Motown artist Brenda Holloway, singer and songwriter ("Love And Desire", "Ecstasy", and "You Made Me So Very Happy") as well as being the singing voice of Valerie for TV's "Josie And The Pussycats". In Los Angeles, USA, following a heart attack

Jackie Rae
(84), songwriter of such hits as Eddie Arnold's "Please Don't Go" and Andy Williams' "Happy Heart" and whose songs have been recorded by Engelbert Humperdinck and Tony Bennett. In Winnipeg, Canada, of heart failure

Freddy Fender
(69), singer, songwriter and guitarist ("Wasted Days And Wasted Nights" and "Before The Next Teardrop Falls"). In Corpus Christi, Texas, USA, of lung cancer

Bruno Lauzi
(69), singer and songwriter ("Amore Caro, Amore Bello" and "Onda Su Onda") who worked with Lucio Battisti, Mogol, Edoardo Bennato and Mia Martini. In Peschiera Borromeo, Italy of parkinson's disease

Walt Harper
(80), pianist and composer ("Just The Taste") who led his own bands and was the owner of Walt Harper's Attic which showcased artists such as Mel Torme, Nancy Wilson, Joe Williams, and Maynard Ferguson. In Point Breeze, Massachusetts, USA following a heart attack

Nigel Holton
(54), composer who wrote music for such films as "Quake" and "Only The Strong". Following a drowning in New Zealand

Eddy Medora
(61), singer, songwriter and member of The Sunrays ("I Live For The Sun" and "Andrea"). In Los Angeles, California, USA, following a heart attack

Edward Alperson
(81), composer and producer who wrote the music scores and songs for such films as "September Storm", "I Mobster", "Courage Of Black Beauty", "The Restless Breed", "Mohawk" and "Rose Of Cimarron". In Encino, California, USA, of heart failure

Freddie Marsden
(66), songwriter ("Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying"), and member of Gerry And The Pacemakers. In Dingle, Liverpool, England, of heart failure

Dennis Linde
(63), who wrote Elvis Presley's "Burning Love" and The Dixie Chicks' "Goodbye Earl". International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of lung disease.

Pierre Delanoe
(88), composer who wrote more than 5,000 songs including "Et Maintenant" (What Now My Love) and "Je t'Appartiens" (Let It Be Me) and who collaborated with Gilbert Becaud. His songs have been recorded by Edith Piaf, Charles Aznavour, The Everly Brothers, Tom Jones, Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Nina Simone, Johnny Hallyday, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, The Supremes, and The Temptations. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Poissy, France, of cardiac arrest

Marian Grudeff
(79), composer, singer and musician who co-wrote the score for the Broadway musical "Baker Street". In Toronto, Canada, of heart failure

Sam Neely
(58), singer, songwriter and guitarist ("Lovin' You Just Crossed My Mind" and "You Can Have Her") as well  as being a member of Buckle who sang the final song in the final episode of TV's "MASH". In Corpus Christi, Texas, USA, following a heart attack

Johnny Duncan
(68), singer and songwriter ("Sweet Country Woman" and "She Can Put Her Shoes Under My Bed, Anytime") who worked with Janie Fricke  ("Stranger" and "Thinkin' Of A Rendezvous"), whose songs have been recorded by Charley Pride and Conway Twitty and who was a cousin of singers Dan Seals and Jimmy Seals. In Fort Worth, Texas, USA, following a heart attack

Ian Hamer
(74), trumpeter, composer and bandleader, who was a member of Mrs Wilf Hamer's Band and worked with Carl Barriteau, Oscar Rabin, Vic Lewis, The Kirchin Brothers, Tubby Hayes ("Night In Tunisia"), The Beatles ("Got To Get You Into My Life"), Bing Crosby, Tom Jones, Dusty Springfield, Shirley Bassey, Barbra Streisand, James Last, Matt Munro and, Kenny Wheeler, Eric Delaney, Jack Parnell, John Dankworth, Harry South, Joe Harriott, Mike Gibbs, Barbara Thompson, the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Band and Ted Heath, as well as working on Top Of The Pops for over 20 years. In Brighton, UK, of cancer

Danny Flores
(77), singer, saxophonist, guitarist and songwriter, and a member of The 3-D Ranch Boys, The Creshendoes and The Champs ("Tequila" which he wrote). Worked with Dave Burgess and Glen Campbell. In Westminster, California, USA, following a heart attack

Maxine Edgington
(48), songwriter who co-wrote "We Laughed" with Billy Bragg. In Dorset, UK, of breast cancer

Joseph Stefano
(84), composer, lyricist and writer ("One Dream Tells Me" and "Heartbeat") as well as the off Broadway musical comedy "It's Your Move" and the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's, "Psycho" along with such shows as "Eye Of The Cat," and "The Kindred". He was also part owner of TV's "The Outer Limits". In Philadelphia, USA, of heart failure

Jumpin' Gene Simmons
(69), singer and songwriter ("Haunted House" and "Go On Shoes") who co-wrote "Indian Outlaw" for Tim McGraw. He worked with The Bill Black Combo and Elvis Presley. In Tupelo, Mississippi, USA, of cancer

Earl Heywood
(89), songwriter who wrote "Tales Of The Donnelly Feud" and "Moonlight On Manitoulin Island" as well as leading The CKNX Barndance Gang while a member of The Serenade Ranch Gang ("Alberta Waltz" and "Tears Of St. Anne"). In Exeter, Ontario Canada, of heart failure

John Wyre
(65), composer and percussionist who wrote "Bernie" and "First Flower". He was a member of Nexus and worked with The Toronto Symphony Orchestra, The Kronos Quartet, The Japan Philharmonic, The Lyric Arts Trio and The Canadian Brass. In Toronto, Canada, of heart failure

Timothea Beckerman
(55), singer and songwriter ("Teenage Prayer") who worked with Dr. John, Johnny Adams, Leon Russell and Walter "Wolfman" Washington as well as Founding Blue Soul Records. In New York, USA, of hepatitis C

John Blackburn
(93), songwriter and manager who co-wrote, "Moonlight In Vermont" and "Need You" and who, along with his wife, created Selective Records. In Massilon, Ohio, USA, of heart failure

Robert Percell Ferguson
(77), singer, songwriter and pianist ("Good Lovin'" and "Rock H-Bomb Rock") who led H. Bomb Ferguson And The Medicine Men as well as being a member of The US Blues Shouters and working with the HoneyDrippers. In Blue Ash, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA of emphysema and cardiopulmonary disease

Dottie Burman
(65), singer and songwriter ("When The Palm Trees Grow In Central Park" and "I'm Doin' The Best I Can") as well as the one-woman show, "Five Shows A Day" and the musical "I'm In Love With My Computer". In New York City, USA, of heart failure

Joseph Hampson
(78), bassist and songwriter ("Talk About Peace"), and a member of The Travellers, working with The Wayfarers, The Phoenix Singers and The North York Concert Orchestra. He was the husband of singer Sharon Hampson (Trostin) of the group Sharon, Lois And Bram. In Toronto, Canada, of lung cancer

Michael Colicchio
(82), composer, pianist, and arranger who wrote, "La La Linda" as well as music for TV's "Rudolph And Frosty's Christmas In July" and for the film "Brown Eye, Evil Eye". In Westfall Township, PA, USA, of heart failure.

Marti Sharron
(56), songwriter and producer who co-wrote The Pointer Sisters' "Jump For My Love" and Chaka Khan's "Own The Night", as well as producing Natalie Cole and Anita Baker. Her songs have been recorded by Celine Dion, Ray Charles and Barbra Streisand. In Sherman Oaks, California, USA, of cancer

Songwriter Obituaries 2005

Merle Kilgore
(71), singer, songwriter, DJ, actor and manager, who wrote Johnny Horton's "Johnny Reb" and Claude King's "Wolverton Mountain" as well as co-writing with June Carter Cash,  Johnny Cash's "Ring Of Fire", as well as managing Hank Williams Jr., and working with his father, Hank Williams Sr. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Mexico City, Mexico, of complications from treatment for cancer

Willie Hutch
(60), singer, and producer ("Love Has Put Me Down" and "Give Me Some Of That Good Old Love") and songwriter ("I'll Be There"), who was a member of The Ambassadors while also producing  Michael Jackson, The 5th Dimension, The Commodores and Smokey Robinson. In Duncanville, Texas, USA of cancer

Derrill Bodley
(59), writer of such pieces "The Dream Lives On!" and Dave Brubeck's, "Steps To Peace". A music professor and peace activist, he was killed in a motorcycle accident

Richard Jameson Bell Jr
(58), composer, arranger and pianist who worked with Janis Joplin. In Chester, New Hampshire, USA, of heart failure

Sonny Fisher
(74), singer, guitarist and songwriter ("Rockin' Daddy" and "Hold Me Baby") who worked with Los Solitarios. In Houston, Texas, USA, following a heart attack

Kay Arnold
(79),  singer and songwriter ("Cross The Brazos At Waco" and "Paint A Smile On Me" with Merle Kilgore) who worked with her husband, Marvin "Buster" Doss and with Gary Walker. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

David Townsend
(50), son of singer and songwriter Ed Townsend, singer, songwriter, producer and a member of Surface ("Closer Than Friends" and "Shower Me With Your Love") who worked with Sister Sledge, The Isley Brothers, Jermaine Jackson, The New Edition and Aretha Franklin. In Northbridge, California, USA, of unknown causes

Rick Rhode
(54), songwriter and composer, and a member of Wonder, who collaborated with his wife Vivian Rhodes ("Let's Be Lovers Again" and "Fasten Your Seat Belts") as well as composing music for TV's "The Guiding Light", "Another World, "Saturday Night Live and "Friends."  In Oak Park, California, USA, of brain cancer

John Finch
(84), songwriter and owner of The Finch Record Publishing Co, which recorded H-Bomb Ferguson ("She Don't Want Me"), Albert Washington, The Impossibles, The Cruisers, The  Five Chances and The Al Franklin Combo. In Washington, Georgia, USA, of heart failure

Al Frazier
(75), singer and songwriter, who was a member of The Lamplighters, and The Rivingtons ("Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow" and "The Bird's The Word") as well as working with Paul Anka and Duane Eddy. In Las Vegas, Nevada, USA of diabetic complications

Joe Jones
(79), singer, pianist, arranger and songwriter whose biggest hit was the US Number 1 "You Talk Too Much" and who worked with B B King. In Los Angeles, USA, of complications from quadruple bypass surgery 

Baker Knight
(72), singer and songwriter, who wrote hits for such stars as Ricky Nelson ("Lonesome Town"), Paul McCartney, Dean Martin ("That Old Time Feelin"), Elvis Presley ("The Wonder Of You"), Frank Sinatra, Perry Como, Mickey Gilley, Sammy Davis Jr. and Jerry Lee Lewis. In Birmingham  Alabama, USA, of heart failure

Link Wray
(76), guitarist and songwriter ("Rumble" and "Rawhide"), and a member of Link Wray And The Ray-Men who worked with Robert Gordon and whose music can be heard in the films, "Pulp Fiction" and "Independence Day". In Copenhagen, Denmark, following a heart attack

Romano Mussolini
(75), pianist, bandleader and jazz composer, who led the Romano Mussolini All Stars and worked with Helen Merrill, Tony Scott and Chet Baker. He was the son of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. In Romy, Italy, following a heart attack

Gene McFadden
(57), singer, songwriter and producer who was a member of The Epsilons ("The Echo") and half of the duo McFadden & Whitehead ("Ain't No Stopping Us Now" and "I've Been Pushed Aside") who changed their name to Talk Of The Town.  He wrote songs for The O'Jays ("Backstabbers"), Archie Bell & The Drells ("Let's Groove") and Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes ("Wake Up Everybody") and worked with Gloria Gaynor, Melba Moore, Willie Collins and Freddie Jackson. In Philadelphia, USA, of cancer

Johnny Bienstock
(84), publisher and music executive who worked at Big Top, Atlantic, Cotillion and RSO Records, as well as owning Moss Rose Music and acting as general manager for E.B. Mark Music Company, working with Ernest Tubb, Eddy Arnold, Hank Snow, Elvis Presley, The Bee Gees, Eric Clapton, Del Shannon, Johnny & The Hurricanes and Meat Loaf In Naples, Florida, USA, of complications from heart disease and a stroke

Sergio Endrigo
(72), singer and songwriter ("Io Che Amo Solo Te (I Who Love Only You)") and "Canzone Per Te (Song For You)"). In Rome, Italy, from lung cancer

Fred E. Ahlert
(79), founder of the Fred Ahlert Music Group who represented clients such as his father - songwriter Fred E. Ahlert as well as Hal David and John Jacob Loeb. In San Francisco, California, USA, of heart failure

Mike Elliott
(65), guitarist, producer, engineer and songwriter who worked with the Toronto Symphony, Clark Terry, Doug Kershaw, Les Paul, Chubby Checker, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Brenda Lee, John Davidson, Johnny Cash and many others. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of heart failure

Marion Skelton
(who also worked as Marion Payton) (64), published poet, songwriter and author, who penned over 400 songs, along with almost 200 poems, as well as publishing three books. In Wolverhampton, UK, after a short illness

Gene Pitney
(65), singer and songwriter ("Only Love Can Break A Heart", "24 Hours From Tulsa" and "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance") and half of the duo, Jamie & June with Ginny Arnell. He wrote "Hello Mary Lou" for Rick Nelson", "Rubber Ball" for Bobby Vee, and "He's A Rebel" for The Crystals, working with Phil Spector, The Rolling Stones, George Jones, and Marc Almond ("Something's Gotten Hold Of My Heart"). A Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Cardiff, Wales, UK, of heart failure

Buck Owens
(76), singer and songwriter who led Buck Owens & His Buckaroos ("Act Naturally" and "I've Got A Tiger By The Tail") and a member of Bill Woods & The Orange Blossom Playboys and The Schoolhouse Playboys. He co-hosted TV's "Hee Haw", working with with Tommy Collins, Tommy Sands, Don Rich, Wanda Jackson and Faron Young. A Country Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Bakersfield, California, USA, of heart failure

Cindy Walker
(87), songwriter whose work was recorded by such stars as Bob Wills ("Bubbles In My Beer"), Roy Orbison ("Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)"), Eddy Arnold ("Take Me In Your Arms And Hold Me"), Hank Snow ("The Gold Rush Is Over"), George Morgan, Gene Autry, Jim Reeves ("Distant Drums"), Jerry Wallace, Ray Charles, Mickey Gilley, Ricky Skaggs, Merle Haggard, Glen Campbell, Michael Nesmith, Webb Pierce and Ernest Tubb ("Warm Red Wine"). A Country Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Mexia, Texas, USA, of heart failure

David Blume
(74), keyboardist, arranger and composer who co-wrote The Cyrkle's "Turn Down Day" and led The Dave Blume Trio, working with his wife, singer Carolyn Hester. In Sylmar, California, USA following a stroke

John Harris
(63), composer who penned music for TV's "M*A*S*H" and was a music editor for the movies, "History Of The World: Part 1", "Johnny Dangerously" and "Nine To Five". In Woodland Hills, California, USA, following a heart attack

Hamilton Camp
(72), British born actor, singer and songwriter who wrote "Pride Of Man" which was covered by Quicksilver Messenger Service and worked with Bob Gibson ("You Can Tell The World" and "Well, Well, Well"). He also appeared in the films, "Attack Of The 50 Foot Woman" and "Heaven".  In Hancock Park, Los Angeles, California, USA, of cancer 

Robert Wright
(81), composer and pianist who collaborated with George "Chet" Forrest on the Broadway musicals Song of Norway and Grand Hotel and worked with Helen Morgan. In Miami, Florida, USA, of heart failure

Eugene Record
(65), singer and songwriter ("Laying Beside You"), who was a member of The Chanteurs ("You Did That To Me") and The Hi-Lites who changed their name to The Chi-Lites ("Oh Girl" and "Have You Seen Her") and who worked with Jackie Wilson and C-Nario. In Chicago, USA, of cancer

Fred Smith
(67), songwriter and producer who produced and co-wrote songs for The Olympics ("Western Movies"), Bob And Earl ("Harlem Shuffle") and The Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band, and who also worked with Cliff Goldsmith. In Los Angeles, USA, following a heart attack

Little Milton Campbell
(71), song of legendary blues performer Big Milton, blues singer, guitarist and songwriter ("The Blues Is Alright", "We're Gonna Make It" and "Your Wife Is Cheating On Us"), who worked with Sonny Boy Williamson II and Fontella Bass. In Inverness, Mississippi, USA, following a stroke

Spud Murphy
(96), composer, arranger, bandleader and teacher, who created or arranged music for The Three Stooges, The Honey Boys, Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra and Benny Goodman, as well as composing music for over 50 films. In Los Angeles, California, USA, following complications from surgery

Detroit Junior
(74), pianist and songwriter ("Money Tree" and "Too Poor"), who worked with Howlin' Wolf and whose songs were recorded by such singers as Koko Taylor. In Chicago, USA, of heart failure

Herta Ware
(88), folk singer, songwriter and actress who worked with  Woody Guthrie and acted in  Broadway's The Cradle Will Rock,  the films, Cocoon and Species and TV's Star Trek: The Next Generation and Amazing Stories. In Topanga, USA, of heart failure

Sergio Endrigo
(72), singer and songwriter ("Io Che Amo Solo Te (I Who Love Only You)" and "Canzone Per Te (Song For You)") who collaborated with Vinicius de Moraes and  Toquinho. In Rome, Italy, of lung cancer

Joel Hirschhorn
(67), songwriter, singer and pianist who collaborated with Al Kasha, writing music for TV's Knots Landing and the songs, "The Morning After" for the film "The Poseidon Adventure", "I'd Like To Be You For A Day" for the film "Freaky Friday", "We May Never Love Like This Again" for the film "The Towering Inferno", the original score for "Pete's Dragon" plus songs for Elvis Presley and Charles Aznavour. In Thousand Oaks, California, USA, following a heart attack.

Jack Segal
(86), songwriter and lyricist who penned "Scarlet Ribbons" and co-wrote "When Sunny Gets Blue", and whose songs have been recorded by Tony Bennett, Dinah Shore, Harry Belafonte, Perry Como and Frank Sinatra. In Tarzana, Calufornia, USA, of heart failure

Chris Curtis
(63), drummer, singer and songwriter, and a former member of The Searchers ("Needles And Pins" and "Love Potion Number 9"), The Flowerpot Men ("Let's Go To San Francisco"), Roundabout who later became Deep Purple and The Merseycats, and who later produced Paul and Barry Ryan. In Oldham, UK, of cancer

Hugh Davies
(61), electronic music composer, musicologist and instrument maker, who was a member of Gentle Fire and worked with The Music Improvisation Company, Han Bennink and Hans-Karsten Raecke. In London, of cancer

Sammi Smith
(61), singer and songwriter ("Help Me Make It Through The Night" and "So Long Charlie Brown, Don't Look For Me Around"). In Oklahoma City, USA, of emphysema

Bill Potts
(75), jazz pianist, composer and arranger who worked with Woody Herman, Bobby Vinton, Paul Anka, Quincy Jones, Buddy Rich and Ella Fitzgerald. In Plantation, Florida, USA, of cardiac arrest

Jeremy Hare
(33), singer and songwriter ("In The Morning Sun"). In Wilmington, Delaware, USA, following a fall from the fourth floor of a car park

Jimmy Griffin
(61), singer-songwriter who wrote Conway Twitty's "Who's Gonna Know", Restless Heart's "You Can Depend On Me" and co-wrote The Carpenters' "For All We Know", as well as being a founding member of Bread ("Everything I Own" and "Baby I'm A Wanting You"), The Remingtons ("A Long Time Ago" and "Wall Around Her Heart") and Black Tie ("Learning The Game") and working with Lynn Bryant ("Can We Still Be Friends") and Terry Sylvester. In Franklin, Tennessee, of complications from cancer

William Pippin
(45), gospel singer and songwriter ("His Second Time Around" and "I'll See You Soon") and a founding member of The Chosen who also worked with Segos And Naomi and Jerry And The Singing Goffs. In Columbus, Georgia, USA, following a heart attack

Bezerra da Silva
(77), singer, musician and composer ("Hey Cat - Give Us A Break" and "Somebody Kidnapped My Mother-In-Law"). In Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, of pulmonary emphysema

Uzi Hitman
(52), songwriter and performer ("Adon Olam", Noladati Lashalom", "Ratziti Sheteda" and "Kan"), who reached the third place at the 1991 Eurovision Song Contest. In Tel Aviv, Israel, following a heart attack

Bill Spivery
(73), songwriter of such songs as "Operator" which became popular with the help of The Manhattan Transfer. In Cleveland, USA, following a heart attack

Rob Heaton
(43), drummer, instrumentalist, songwriter and a member of New Model Army ("Poison Street" and "Here Comes The War"). In Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK, of pancreatic cancer

Pete Jolly
(72), pianist and composer ("Little Bird"), who led The Pete Jolly Trio and worked with Benny Carter, Chet Baker, Herb Geller, Barney Kessel and The Shorty Rogers Giants. In Pasadena, California, USA, of complications of bone marrow cancer and an irregular heartbeat

Ernie Garven
(94), musician, vocalist and songwriter, who composed the music for such jingles as "From The Land Of Sky Blue Waters" (Hamm's Beer) as well as jingles for Wheaties, Dairy Queen and Snickers/Mars Bars, and who was a member of The Three Tones, The Red River Gang and Ernie And Hal The Harmony Pals. In Los Angeles, of cardiopulmonary arrest

Billy Scott
(81), ukulele and banjolele player, singer and songwriter, ("He's Only Singing For One"), who worked with The Saturated Seven. In Sunderland, UK, of heart failure

Michel Colombier
(65), jazz pianist and composer who scored over than 100 movies and television shows  including, "White Nights", "Against All Odds", "Swept Away", "New Jack City", "Purple Rain" and "Tales From The Crypt", and who became known as the godfather of French fusion. In Santa Monica, California, USA, of cancer

Cy Coleman
(75), musician and composer ("Witchcraft" and "The Best Is Yet To Come"), who led The Cy Coleman Trio and wrote for the musicals, "Sweet Charity" and "City of Angels", working with lyricists Carolyn Leigh and Dorothy Fields. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In New York, of heart failure

George Canseco
(70), songwriter who penned over 160 songs, including "I Am A Filipino", commissioned by Imelda Marcos. In Manila, Philippines, of complications from liver disease and lung cancer

Nadine Renee
(32), singer and songwriter ("Be A Better Man" and "Say You'll Stay") and a member of Planet Soul ("Set U Free"). In New York, following complications from childbirth

Richard Henry
(83), blues musician and composer. In Beaufort, North Carolina, USA, of heart failure

Delsey McKay
(80), pianist and songwriter ("Hold Her Hand A Little Higher" and "Sing American Sing"). In New York, USA, of cancer

John Marabuto
(79), jazz arranger and composer. In El Cerrito, California, USA of heart failure.

Lee Mallory
(60), guitarist and songwriter who was a member of Millennium and Saggitarius and worked with The Association, co-writing their hits "Better Times" and "Just About The Same". In San Francisco, California, USA, of liver cancer

Derrick Plourde
(34), drummer and songwriter who was a member of Lagwagon, Bad Astronauts, RKL and The Ataris and also worked with The Mad Caddies, Jaws, and Threatened Hope. In Goleta City, California, USA, of self-inflicted gunshot wounds

Duke McFadden
(48), songwriter and pianist, and an original member of 707, who co-wrote "I Could Be Good For You". In Los Angeles, California, USA, of natural causes

Wally Tax
(57), singer, songwriter, guitarist, and a member of The Outsiders ("Lying All The Time" and "Summer Is Here"), Tax Free ("Yiva" and "My Lady Truth") and who worked with John Cale, Bamboule, George Cash, Watermen and The Mustangs. In Amsterdam, Holland, of cancer

Johnnie Johnson
(81), one of the founding fathers of rock and roll, pianist and composer ("Son's Dream" and "Movin' Out") who led The Johnnie Johnson Trio and Johnnie Johnson And The Kentucky Headhunters ("That'll Work" and "She's Got To Have It") and who also worked with Chuck Berry ("Roll Over Beethoven" and "No Particular Place To Go"), Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, John Lee Hooker and Bo Diddley. In St Louis, Missouri, USA, of heart failure

Steve Jablecki
(59), singer, guitarist and songwriter and a member of Wadsworth Mansion ("Sweet Mary" and "Michigan Harry Slaughter") and Slingshot. In Pawtucket, Rhode Island, USA, of heart failure

John Fred Gourrier
(64), singer and songwriter who led the John Fred And The Playboys ("Shirley") and John Fred & His Playboy Band ("Judy in Disguise (With Glasses)" and "Hey, Hey Bunny"). In New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, of cancer

Bob Gardiner
(54), writer and musician who performed original satiric songs and who worked with Mason Williams for two Smothers Brothers specials. In Grass Valley, California, USA, by suicide

Robert Farnon
(87), composer, conductor, trumpeter and arranger who wrote music for more than forty films including "Spring In Park Lane" and "Captain Horatio Hornblower" and led The Robert Farnon Orchestra, working with Lynn Fields ("You Can't Be True Dear"), Norman Wisdom, Denny Dennis, Beryl Davis, Reggie Goff, Scotty McHarg, Dick James,  Donald Peers, The CBC Orchestra, The Johnston Brothers, Sarah Vaughan, Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra and Jose Carreras. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Guernsey, Channel Islands, following a heart attack

Johnny Moore
(65), singer and songwriter ("Just My Way Of Loving You" and "Tears Of Joy"). In Los Angeles, of heart failure   

George Butler
(69), singer, songwriter and harmonica player ("Gravy Child" and "Everybody Got A Mojo"), who worked with Big Walter Horton, Jimmy Rogers, Sammy Lawhorn, Pinetop Perkins, Sam Lay, Aaron Burton, Mighty Joe Young, Big Walter Horton and Willie Dixon. In Windsor, Ontario, Canada of pulmonary embolism

Martin Denny
(94), jazz musician and composer whose hits include "Quiet Village" and who worked with Arthur Lyman. In Hawaii Kai, Hawaii, USA, of heart failure

Chris LeDoux
(57), guitarist, singer-songwriter ( "Even Cowboys Like A Little Rock And Roll" and "Riding For A Fall") who worked with with Garth Brooks ("Whatcha Gonna Do With A Cowboy"), Toby Keith ("Copenhagen") and Jon Bon Jovi ("Bang A Drum"). In Nashville, Tennessee, USA of liver cancer

Marvin Jenkins
(72), songwriter  who wrote, "Big City" which has been recorded by Cannonball Adderley, Shirley Horn and Les McCann and whoworked with The Barney Kessel Trio, Marvin Gaye ("Let's Get It On") and Della Reese. In Aultman, Ohio, USA of heart failure

Chris Cox
(58), singer, songwriter and guitarist who worked with Suzanne Paris, Bobby Mason, Dan Forde, Richard Hathaway, Brian DeWolf, Jason Perrin, Tai Vare, Bobby Yang, Dave Johnson, Buddy Miles and Khristie Krantz. In New York, or natural causes

Danny Joe Brown
(54), singer, songwriter and member of Molly Hatchet ("Flirtin' With Disaster" and "Whiskey Man"), and who led Danny Joe Brown & The Danny Joe Brown Band ("The Alamo" and "Sundance"). In Davie, Florida, USA, of pneumonia

Justin Hinds
(63), singer and songwriter ("Carry Go Bring Come" and "Jump Out The Frying Pan") and who was a member of The Dominoes and who worked with The Jamaica All Stars. In Steertown, St Anns, Jamaica of lung cancer

Jakson Spires
(53), drummer, singer and songwriter and a member of Blackfoot ("Highway Song" and "Fly Away") and The Southern Rock All-Stars and who worked with Benny Mardones, Phil Lynott, Willie Dixon and Albert King. In Fort Pierce, Florida, USA

Ken Hunt
(34), bassist, drummer, singer, songwriter, journalist, poet and a member of Toast, Harvey Wallbanger, Self-Help Seminar, Unplanned Pregnancy and Mayor Daley. In Chicago, Illinois, USA, following an accident

Jack Keller
(68), songwriter who wrote Chordettes' "Just Between You and Me", Connie Francis' "Everybody's Somebody's Fool", Jimmy Clanton's "Venus In Blue Jeans" and Bobby Vee's "Run To Him", along with the theme songs for TV's "Bewitched" and "Gidget". Keller also produced The Monkees and worked with Howard Greenfield and Ernie Sheldon. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of leukaemia,

Peter Hirsten
(69), Global Music Group founder whose clients include Paul Simon, Rondor Music, ATV Music, Dick James Music, Sting, the Police and the Doors. In London, UK, of heart failure

Zuzana Navarova de Tejada
(45), singer, composer, record producer and leader of KOA ("Barvy Vsecky" and "Jako Santidevi"), and Nerez ("Za Poledne", "Na Vareny Nudli"), as well as working with guitarist Ivan Gutierrez ("Trez" and "Zelene"), folk singer Karel Plihal and Slavek Janousek. In Prague, Czech Republic, of cancer

Darrell Abbott
(38), guitarist and songwriter who was formerly with Pantera ("Cemetery Gates" and "Cowboys From Hell") and Damageplan ("Blink Of An Eye" and "New Found Power") and worked with Nickleback. The son of country songwriter Jerry Abbott, he died having been shot on stage in Columbus, Ohio, USA

Jackson Mac Low
(82), poet, composer and performance artist who as a member of Fluxus and worked with his wife, Anne Tardos and with John Cage. In Manhattan, New York, USA, of complications following a stroke

Harry Roesli
(53), guitarist, composer and singer who founded Depot Kreasi Seni Bandung (DKSB) and The Gang Of Harry Roesli. In West Jakarta, Indonesia, of heart disease

Margaret Fay Shaw
(101), pianist, folkologist and photographer, who wrote down and annotated folk songs of South Uist and the stories behind them using her knowledge of Scottish Gaelic, later publishing the book "Folksongs And Folklore Of South Uist". In Fort William, Scotland, of heart failure

Robert Hoyt
(21), drummer, songwriter and member of Clarion. Killed while serving with the US military in Iraq

Bert Reid
(48), singer, saxophonist, songwriter, producer and a member of The Crown Heights Affair ("Every Beat Of My Heart" and "Dreaming A Dream") who also worked with Unlimited Touch, Raw Silk and Barbara Tucker. In New York, USA, of lung cancer

Johnnie Carl
(57), pianist, composer, conductor and arranger who worked With Celine Dion, John Tesh and Michael Crawford.In Los Angeles, by self-inflicted gunshot wounds

Mack Vickery
(69), singer, songwriter (Jerry Lee Lewis's "Rockin' My Life Away" and George Strait's "The Fireman") and an Alabama Music Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, following a heart attack

Wally Varner
(78), pianist and songwriter ("Crown Him King" and "Bell Of Joy Keep Ringing") who worked with The Blackwood Brothers Quartet, was  co-owner of Varner Music Inc and a Gospel Music Association Hall Of Fame Inductee. In Memphis, Tennessee, USA, of a rare bone disease

Gary Lupico
(49), guitarist, composer, songwriter and co-owner of The Interzone Recording Studio. In Dallas, Texas, USA, of an aneurysm

Ray Peterson
(70), singer and songwriter known as the "Golden Voice of Rock 'n' Roll", whose hits include "The Wonder of You", "Tell Laura I Love Her" and "Corrina, Corrina". He also founded Dunes Records, and worked with Phil Spector during his early years in New York. In Smyrna, Georgia, USA, of  cancer       

Consuelo Velazquez
(89), singer, composer and pianist whose songs include "Besame Mucho (Kiss Me A Lot)" and "No Me Pides Nunca". In Mexico City, Mexico, of respiratory problems       

Johnny Carson
(79), comedian and occasional songwriter who co-wrote with Paul Anka "Johnny's Theme" which opened TV's "The Tonight Show" that Johnny hosted for thirty years. In Los Angeles, USA, of emphysema       

Bill Simmons
(80), songwriter, pianist and guitarist whose songs include "Mississippi" and who was a member of The Light Crust Doughboys, The Texas Cowboy Hall Of Fame, The Texas Western Swing Hall Of Fame, The Rockabilly Hall Of Fame and The International Country Gospel Hall Of Fame. In Irving, Texas, of oesophageal cancer       

Paul Nash
(56), jazz composer and guitarist who wrote, "Still Sounds Run Deep" and led The Paul Nash Ensemble as well as co-founding The Bay Area Jazz Composers Orchestra. In New York City, USA of complications of a brain tumour       

Franco Mannino
(81), composer and pianist who penned more than 600 musical compositions and more than 100 film scores for such movies as "I, Vampiri", "Beat The Devil" and "Death In Venice". In Los Angeles of complications following surgery       

Rachel Bissex
(49), folk singer, songwriter and guitarist ("Dancing With My Mother" and "Drive All Night"). In Boston, USA, of cancer       

Larry Kingston
(64), songwriter whose work includes "Good Morning Loving", "It's Not Over If I'm Not Over You" and "Thank God And Greyhound" and who wrote songs for Porter Waggoner, George Jones, Johnny Paycheck, Reba McEntire, Roy Clark, Don Williams, Ringo Starr, Vern Gosdin, Jerry Lee Lewis and Mark Chesnutt. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA following a heart attack       

Rusty McHugh
(57), country singer, songwriter and musician who led The Rusty McHugh Band and was a member of The Fish Camp Band as well as being half the duo of Rusty McHugh & Mike Fincher ("She Put A Louisiana Liplock On My Alabama Porkchop" and "I Always Get Battered When She Gets Fried"). In Pensacola, Florida, USA, following a heart attack       

Harry M. Simeone
(94), conductor, arranger, composer and pianist whose choral group had hits with, "The Little Drummer Boy" and "Do You Hear What I Hear?" as well as working with Fred Waring And His Pennsylvanians, Victor Young and Bing Crosby. In Manhattan, New York City, USA, of heart failure

Michael J Comley
(62), songwriter whose songs include "Sunrise To Sunset" and "The Look Of Hunger". In Kingswood, Bristol, UK, from cancer

Jaime Mendoza-Nava
(79), pianist who composed music for Walt Disney's, "The Mickey Mouse Club" and "Zorro" and was the music director for United Productions Of America working on the cartoon series "Mr. Magoo" as well as scoring music for over 200 films including "Ballad Of A Gunfighter" and "The Vampire Hookers". In Woodland Hills, California, USA, of heart failure       

Paul Westmoreland
(89), songwriter of such songs as "Detour" which was covered by Dean Martin and Patti Page. In Burney, California, USA, of heart failure   

Carson Parks
(69), singer and songwriter who penned Frank and Nancy Sinatra's "Somethin' Stupid" and also wrote "Cab Driver (Drive By Mary's Place)" and "Open For Business As Usual" as well as being one half of the duo The Steeltown Two  who worked with The Greenwood Country Singers, The Easy Riders, Carson & Gaile, The Southcoasters and Bud Dashiell & The Kinsmen. He was the brother of the musician and film composer Van Dyke Parks  In St Mary's. Georgia, USA, of kidney failure       

Dickson Hughes
(82), songwriter who wrote the first musical version of "Sunset Boulevard". In Palm Springs, Florida, USA, of heart failure       

Obie Benson
(68), songwriter who wrote Marvin Gaye's, "What's Going On" and was co-founder of The Four Aims who later changed their name to The Four Tops. In Detroit, Michigan, USA, of lung cancer       

Tom Talbert
(80), composer, pianist and arranger who wrote music for TV's "Serpico" and "Emergency". In Los Angeles, California, USA, following a stroke       

Derek Hilton
(78), composer who wrote music for over 240 TV shows including, "All Our Yesterdays", "A Family At War" and "A Kind Of Loving", as well as the theme tune for the long-running TV soap "Coronation Street", In Didsbury, near Manchester, UK, of heart failure       

Joe Harnell
(81), pianist, composer and arranger who worked with The Glenn Miller Air Force Band, Frank Sinatra, Peggy Lee, Shirley MacLaine, Marlene Dietrich, Judy Garland,  Lester Lanin,  Maurice Chevalier, Lena Horne, Pearl Bailey and Beverly Sills as well as composing the music for TV's "The Incredible Hulk" and "The Bionic Woman". In New York City, USA, of heart failure       

Eddie Shuler
(92), songwriter  who specialised in Zydeco music, and founded Goldband Records, working with Freddy Fender and Cookie & The Cupcakes. In Wrightsboro, Texas, USA, of heart failure.

Michael Hensey
(55), poet and songwriter. In Claremorris, Co Mayo, Ireland, after a short illness       

Luther Vandross
(52), songwriter and singer who worked with Mariah Carey ("Endless Love"), Roberta Flack, David Bowie, Barbara Streisand, Donna Summer, Dionne Warwick, Quincy Jones, Chaka Khan, Chic,  Janet Jackson ("The Best Things In Life Are Free") and Aretha Franklin. In Edison, New Jersey, USA, following a stroke

La Marr Thomas
(62). songwriter who co-wrote "Love Depression" and "Free" which were recorded by Johnnie Taylor. In New York, USA, of cancer        .

Eddie Barclay
(84), pianist and founder of Barclay Records who wrote the score for the film "Bob Le Flambeur" and worked with Quincy Jones as well as recording and promoting such stars as Léo Ferré, Charles Aznavour, Jacques Brel, Blossom Dearie, Claude Nougaro and Mireille Mathieu. In Paris, France, following a heart attack       

Keith Miller
(58), keyboardist and guitarist who co-wrote Divine's "You Think You're A Man" as well as being a member of St Louis Union, who had a UK hit with the Beatles' "Girl" and who also worked with Rod Stewart, Viv Stanshall, Robert Plant, Rick Wakeman, Sniff 'N' The Tears ("Driver's Seat"), The Raymond Froggatt Band, Culture Club, Locomotive, Paul McCartney, The Steve Gibbons Band, Ultravox and Pete Townsend. In Manchester, UK, following a brain haemorrhage       

Linda Martinez
(29), pianist and composer ("Gunther And I") who also wrote music for the films, "Catching Kringle" and "Boy Next Door", and who worked with Laura Karpman. In Los Angeles, California, USA, by suicide       

Ben Peters
(71), songwriter, singer and musician ("Daytime Friends and Night-time Lovers" and "Kiss An Angel Good Morning"), whose songs have been recorded by Tammy Wynette, Eddy Arnold, Ray Charles, Freddie Fender, Engelbert Humperdinck, George Jones, Conway Twitty, Brenda Lee, Charley Pride, Jerry Lee Lewis, Barbara Mandrell, Dean Martin, Ronnie Milsap, Lorrie Morgan, Willie Nelson, Loretta Lynn and Kenny Rogers. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Hollandale, Mississippi, USA, of pneumonia       

Oscar Brown Jr
(78). singer, songwriter and playwright  whose works include "The Snake" and "Signifyin' Monkey". In Chicago, Illinois, USA, of pneumonia       

Jenny Richards
(46), singer, guitarist and songwriter who wrote "Full Moon Drumming". In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of cancer

Songwriter Obituaries 2004

Ersel Hickey
(70), singer songwriter ("Bluebirds Over The Mountain"), whose songs were recorded by the Beachboys, Ritchie Valens and Jackie Wilson. In New York, USA, of cancer

Steven Marshall
(40), singer-songwriter. Suddenly, in his sleep. In Glasgow, Scotland

Bill Lowery
(79), the music publisher responsible for publishing "Be-Bop-A-Lula", "I Never Promised You A Rose Garden", "Games People Play" and "I Love The Nightlife" among others. In Atlanta, Georgia, USA, of cancer

Graeme Kelling
(47), songwriter and suitarist, and a member of Deacon Blue ("Fellow Hoodlums" and "Cover From The Sky"). In Glasgow, Scotland, of pancreatic cancer

Auntie Martha
(Martha Poepoe Hohu) (87), conductor, composer, arranger, singer and organist. In Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, of heart failure

Eamonn McGirr
(63), Irish guitarist and singer ("The Bravest" commemorating the bravery of the New York firefighters on 9/11 and "Up Went Nelson"). In Schenectady, New York, USA, from complications of paralysis

Paul Jackson
(67), songwriter and a member of  The Vallejos, The Falcons ("My Only Love" and "Now That It's Over") and The Lyrics ("Come On Home" and "Why Don't You Stop"). In New York, USA, of heart failure

Ken Darby
(47), songwriter a member of The Black Irish Band. In Los Angeles, California, USA, following a motorcycle accident

Naomi Shemer
(74), singer songwriter ("Jerusalem Of Gold" and "Lu Yehi"), known as the First Lady of Israeli Song. In Tel Aviv, Israel, of heart failure

Agnes Cunningham
(95), singer and accordionist who wrote, "Sundown" and co-wrote, "My Oklahoma Home (It Done Blowed Away)"). She worked with The Almanac Singers, Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie and was a co-founder of the folk song journal "Broadside", publishing more than 1,000 songs by artists such as Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Janis Ian, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Pete Seeger and Tom Paxton. In New Paltz, New York, USA, of heart failure

Tony Audate
(44), Haitian singer, guitarist and songwriter. In Dorchester, Massachussets, USA, of cancer

Cal Green
(69), singer-songwriter and guitarist ("What Makes Your Pretty Head So Hard" and "Big Leg Woman") who worked with  Hank Ballard & The Midnighters ("Annie Had A Baby" and "Tore Up Over You"), as well as Little Willie John, Brother Jack McDuff and Lou Rawls. In Lake View, Terrace, California, USA, following an aneurysm

Don Rader
(66), band leader and songwriter, who led Don Rader And The Five Stars ("Rock & Roll Grandpap" and "Rockin' The Blues") and Don Rader And The 20th Century Ranch Boys ("Area Code To Heaven" and "Goodbye, I Hate To See You Go"). In Detroit, Michigan, USA, of heart disease

Syreeta Wright
(58), singer and songwriter ("Spinnin' and Spinnin'" and "Your Kiss Is Sweet") who worked with Billy Preston ("With You I'm Born Again"), G. C. Cameron ("Let's Make a Deal"), Michael Bolton, Quincy Jones and Stevie Wonder, to whom she was once married. In Los Angeles, California, USA, of bone cancer

Hal Carter
(69), manager, agent, producer and songwriter ("Come On And Twist"), who worked with Marty Wilde, Billy Fury, Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent, The Liverpool Express, Coast To Coast and The Kinks. In London, UK, of cancer 

Kevin Coyne
(60), singer-songwriter, painter and writer, who released more than forty albums and turned down the opportunity to replace Jim Morrison in the Doors. In Nuremberg, Germany, of complications from lung fibrosis

Terry Melcher
(62), producer, singer, pianist and songwriter (hits include "Kokomo" for the Beachboys, and "Move Over Darling" for his mother, movie star Doris Day), as well as being half of the duo, Bruce & Terry ("Custom Machine" and "Summer Means Fun") and a member of The Rip Chords ("Hey, Little Cobra" and "Here I Stand"). He produced The Byrds ("Mr. Tambourine Man" and "Turn, Turn, Turn") and Paul Revere And The Raiders as well as working with The Beach Boys, Gram Parsons, The Mamas And The Papas, Bobby Darin, Glen Campbell and Ry Cooder.  Son of actress Doris Day and trombonist Al Jorden. In Beverly Hills, California, USA, of cancer

Pat Best
(81), singer, guitarist and songwriter ("(I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons" and "I Understand Just How You Feel") and a member of Deek Watson And The Brown Dots, The Four Tunes, The Tunes Plus One and The Rainbeaus. In Roseville, California, USA, of heart failure

Lalomie Washburn
(70), singer and songwriter ("Try My Love" and "Freaky Strangeness") who worked with Hi Voltage, Buddy Miles, D.J. Rogers, Rufus, Stevie Wonder, Paulinho Da Costa, Quincy Jones and Greg Phillinganes. In New York, USA, of cancer

Shobha Gurtu
(79), singer who also composed music for a number of movies as well as being the mother of jazz musician, Trilok. In Bombay, India, of cardiac arrest

Jacques Levy
(69), songwriter, writer and director who headed Colgate's theatre programme for 12 years and directed, "The Rolling Thunder Review", as well as co-writing songs with Bob Dylan ("Hurricane"), The Byrds ("All The Things") and Roger McGuinn ("Chestnut Mare"), In New York, USA, of cancer

Lester Lanin
(97), bandleader and songwriter ("Pink Petal Waltz"), whose bands played for many US presidential inaugurations and for Prince Charles and Princess Diana's wedding reception for which he wrote, "My Lady Love." In Manhattan, New York, USA, of heart failure

Terry Knight
(61), singer and guitarist who led Terry Knight And The Pack as well as managing and producing Grand Funk Railroad. In Killeen, Texas, USA, following a stabbing incident

Joe Bushkin
(87), jazz pianist and songwriter, who performed with some of the best jazz musicians of his time, including such greats as Fats Waller, Eddie Condon and Billie Holiday. As a member of the Tommy Dorsey band, he co-wrote the hit "Oh! Look At Me Now" with John DeVries, which launched the career of a young Frank Sinatra, the band's vocalist. In New York, USA, of pneumonia.

Dave Dudley
(75), country singer and songwriter whose hits include "Six Days On The Road" and "Truck Drivin' Son Of A Gun". In Spencer, Wisconsin, USA, following a heart attack

Gary Stewart
(58), country singer-songwriter, whose hits include "Out Of Hand" and "She's Actin' Single (I'm Drinkin' Doubles)". In Fort Pierce, Florida, USA, from a self-inflicted gunshot

Don Jobe
(51) singer-songwriter, who was a member of The Otis Wheat Band, Louisiana Hot Sauce and The Mason Dixon Band. In Faraday, Louisiana, USA, following a car accident

Peter Moscos
(55), guitarist, singer, songwriter and producer, and a member of The Sect ("Lonely Road" and "St. John's Wood"), The Platterpushers who later became Burke & Wills ("Thank You" and "Come With Me"), Moscos & Stone ("Captain Captain" and "Trouble In The City"), and who wrote songs for many Australian artists and TV productions. In Sydney, Australia, of cancer

Charles R Green
(90), songwriter who penned Phil Harris's "The Thing" and did the string arrangement for Nat King Cole's "The Christmas Song". In Manhattan, New York, USA, of pneumonia

Dick St John
(63), singer-songwriter and one half of the duo Dick & Dee Dee ("The Mountain's High" and "Thou Shalt Not Steal"), plus several releases backed by the Rolling Stones. In Los Angeles, California, USA, following a fall from a ladder

Harpo Kidwell
(91), country musician and songwriter who wrote "How Many Biscuits Can You Eat?" and "Boo-Hoo Blues". In Adairsville, Georgia, USA, of complications from Parkinson's disease

Peter Torres
(61), singer, keyboardist, songwriter and a member of Billy And The Essentials ("The Dance Is Over" and "Maybe You'll Be There"). In Collingdale, Pennsylvania, USA, following a seizure

Lorene Allen
(77), songwriter of such country hits as  "Another Man Loved Me Last Night" and "Let Me Go, You're Hurtin' Me", and whose songs were recorded by such stars as Loretta Lynn, Pat Boone, Sonny James, Marie Osmond, Charlie Louvin, Conway Twitty, Eddy Arnold, Dottie West, Ernest Tubb and Don Gibson. In Hominy, Oklahoma, USA, of cancer

Max D Barnes
(73), country singer-songwriter whose hits include "Chiselled In Stone" and "Look At Us" and whose songs were recorded by Charley Pride, Randy Travis, Waylon Jennings, Vince Gill and others. International Songwriters Association Hall Of Fame Member. In Nashville, Tennessee, USA, of pneumonia

Randy VanWarmer
(48), singer-songwriter of such hits as  "Just When I Needed You Most". In Seattle, Washington, USA, of leukaemia

Donald Siegal
(54), composer and lyricist who wrote songs for TV's "Captain Kangaroo" and worked with Jim Henson to write songs for TV's "Sesame Street". In New York City, USA, of leukaemia

Songwriter Obituaries Prior To 2004

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